Collection of the artist. Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo/Singapore; Victoria Miro, London; David Zwirner, New York. © Yayoi Kusama

State of the Arts: Kusama's 'Infinity Mirrors' Comes to Cleveland

It took more than 50 years for Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama to finally get the recognition her male counterparts gained in the 1960s. Now people in Northeast Ohio can take in her work for themselves. On this week’s State of the Arts, WKSU’s Mark Arehart goes to the Cleveland Museum of Art and steps into Yayoi Kusama's "Infinity Mirrors.”

Read More
photo of pension meeting
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Members of the U.S. Congress left Capitol Hill and held a special meeting in Columbus on the national pension crisis. Pension plans for more than 1 million union workers and retirees are in danger of collapse if something isn’t done soon. More than 60,000 Ohio workers could be impacted.

Federal Program Targets Lorain County Fentanyl Dealers

Jul 13, 2018
photo of substance found at drug bust that may be fentanyl
U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency

Stemming the tide of drug overdose deaths in Lorain County and nine others across the country is the focus of a new pilot program from the U.S. Attorney General’s office.

photo of Rich Cordray and Mike DeWine
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Republican candidate for governor says he’s had a plan to keep Medicaid expansion for all 700,000 Ohioans covered under it. His Democratic opponent calls that a major about-face. And it shows there’s been a lot of confusion surrounding this key state policy and what either candidate will do with Medicaid expansion if he is elected.

photo of Lake Erie algae
ELIZABETH MILLER / WCPN

Each year, scientists forecast just how bad the algae bloom will be on Lake Erie. And this summer, the green scum is already forming.

Scientists predict a significant harmful algae bloom for western Lake Erie this year.

Elena Bell / The Akron Zoo

The Akron Zoo welcomed a unique deer species to the park last month.

The birth of a Siberian Musk deer, which is still unnamed, is a first for the zoo.  

Spokeswoman Elena Bell said the species is special to this area.

“They’re not a species that is really represented in a lot of zoos," she said. "It’s not an animal that you would think of when you visit the zoo, like the Cleveland Zoo doesn’t have them, the Columbus Zoo, so it’s really cool to be able to experience these unique animals.”

Collection of the artist. Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo/Singapore; Victoria Miro, London; David Zwirner, New York. © Yayoi Kusama

It took more than 50 years for Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama to finally get the recognition her male counterparts gained in the 1960s. Now people in Northeast Ohio can take in her work for themselves. On this week’s State of the Arts, WKSU’s Mark Arehart goes to the Cleveland Museum of Art and steps into Yayoi Kusama's "Infinity Mirrors.”

Photo of dangerous algae bloom in Lake Erie
WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, July 13: 

Hardin County Ohio farm
Ohio Farm Bureau website

The timing of Gov. John Kaisch’s executive order for more urgent protection of Lake Erie from agricultural runoff may be especially bad for Ohio farmers. 

Though there’s progress reported in reducing the flow of algae-feeding farm chemicals into Lake Erie, Gov. John Kasich decided it’s not enough and not fast enough.

The City of Columbus will not press charges against Stephanie Clifford after police officers arrested her for inappropriate touching at a local strip club Wednesday night. Clifford gained national attention under her stage name Stormy Daniels after suing President Donald Trump.

Libertarian Party logo
The Libertarian Party

The Libertarian Party of Ohio has officially regained “minor party” status in the state. 

Secretary of State Jon Husted said the Libertarians submitted more than 60,000 valid signatures, which was more than they needed to get their party’s designation on the ballot with its candidates. 

Pages

From NPR

Many of President Trump's immigration policies are deeply unpopular, including recent efforts to deter illegal immigration by separating migrant families at the border, according to a new NPR-Ipsos poll.

But Americans are polarized in their attitudes about immigrants and the U.S. system for admitting them, the polls shows, with Republicans much more likely to support the president's policies, including the travel ban, the border wall, and changes to legal immigration.

When it comes to immigration policy, American opinions often break down along party lines, with most Republicans supporting President Trump, and Democrats vigorously opposed.

But according to a new NPR-Ipsos poll, there's an even better predictor of how you feel about immigration: where you get your TV news.

Can't cool off this summer? Heat waves can slow us down in ways we may not realize.

New research suggests heat stress can muddle our thinking, making simple math a little harder to do.

Every day, Dr. Walter Koroshetz, 65, takes a pill as part of his effort to help keep his brain healthy and sharp.

The pill is his blood pressure medication. And Koroshetz, who directs the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, says controlling high blood pressure helps him reduce his risk of dementia.

He also keeps his blood pressure down by exercising, and paying attention to his weight and diet. "I'm a believer," he says.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

More from NPR