photo of Carolina Velasco Bautista
MICHELLE FAUST / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

Summer School Helps Bridge the Gap For the Children of Migrant Workers in Ohio

Ohio’s warm, humid summer days are giving way to cooler shorter ones. Families of agricultural workers are preparing to move to other states as the most labor intensive parts of the local growing season come to an end. StateImpact Ohio’s Michelle Faust reports on how a recently completed local summer school program aims to bridge educational gaps for the children in these families. In the small Northwest Ohio township of Old Fort, a class of nine middle and high school students fidget while...
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Ohio prepares to vote
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

A decision throwing out the week where Ohioans could register to vote and cast ballots at the same time is being appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court by Democrat. But Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler says the state is going ahead with its plans to reach out to voters.

More than 7 million absentee ballot applications will go out to registered voters on Friday – part of a 2014 state law that requires Ohio to send those out in presidential election years if lawmakers set aside the money. The law also bans local boards of elections from sending them out.

Daniel Tokaji
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

A recent federal court decision upheld an Ohio law that wiped out the so-called Golden Week, the period of time when voters can both register and cast a ballot at the same time. That’s being appealed. And as Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports, that isn’t the last of legal questions and lawsuits.

 

A look at several online charter school attendance reviews reveal that more e-schools might be either unable or unwilling to meet the standards the state has set to prove students are learning. Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports.

 

photo of Cindy Koumoutzis
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

International Overdose Awareness Day is this Wednesday, and one Stark County group marked the occasion this weekend.

On Saturday in Canton, Ohio Change Addiction Now hosted an event to raise awareness that addiction is a disease that can affect the entire family.

Cindy Koumoutzis from North Canton is co-founder of the group’s Ohio chapter. She says recovery starts at home, and families need to work with those in recovery to rebuild trust and reconnect with spouses and siblings.

photo of Patrick Boylan
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Ohio's liquor stores and craft brewers are limited to beers with 12 percent alcohol-by-volume or less.  But that changes on Wednesday, when a new state law removes that cap.

In 2006, the limit was bumped from 6 to 12 percent, but brewers and vendors in the state have said for years that it’s still too low, citing successful out-of-state beers with much higher alcohol content.

In May, Gov. Kasich agreed and signed a bill removing that cap.

American Probation and Parole Association
AMERICAN PROBATION AND PAROLE ASSOCIATION

The American Probation and Parole Association’s 41st annual training institute is being held in Cleveland this week, focusing on best practices in community corrections.

About 1,200 criminal justice professionals are expected at the convention for workshops and meetings on both adult and juvenile corrections.

Trump's acceptance speech
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Anti-Trump Republicans have launched an ad in Ohio and three other swing states asking the GOP presidential nominee to resign. As WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports, it uses Trump’s own language to make the case.

The 30-second ad is called “Keep Your Word” and leans heavily on an interview Trump did last fall with NBC News, indicating if he were dropping in the polls and the media was losing interest he’d go back to running his business.

“No. 1, I’m not a masochist. And If I was dropping in the polls, where I saw that I wasn’t going to win, why would I continue?”

photo of Carolina Velasco Bautista
MICHELLE FAUST / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

Ohio’s warm, humid summer days are giving way to cooler shorter ones. Families of agricultural workers are preparing to move to other states as the most labor intensive parts of the local growing season come to an end.

StateImpact Ohio’s Michelle Faust reports on how a recently completed local summer school program aims to bridge educational gaps for the children in these families.

photo of PUCO logo
PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION OF OHIO

Some power customers are going to see a decrease in their monthly electric bills thanks to a decision by the Ohio Supreme Court. 

For the second time this year, the Supreme Court decided that attaching a fee to electric bills known as the service stability rider or transition revenue was unlawful.

photo of Cleveland jail
SHUTTERSTOCK / HENRYK SADURA

Gov. John Kasich’s office is not confirming or denying reports that the state’s youth and adult prison systems might merge. 

The Columbus Dispatch is reporting that the next state budget might include a merger of the Ohio Department of Youth Services and the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction.

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Reconnecting You with the Political Process

As part of the Ohio Media Project, WKSU will work to reframe how the 2016 campaigns are covered, restoring your voice in the process

From NPR

It's a sweltering night in July and Los Angeles' Underground Museum is packed. "It's crowded and hot, but it feels really good," says vistor Jazzi McGilbert. Like much of the crowd, McGilbert is young, creative and African-American. She drove across town to this unassuming, bunker-like storefront for an event that combines art and activism. The museum is one of her favorite spots in Los Angeles. "I like what it stands for," McGilbert says. "... And the art is incredible."

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pastor Mark Burns, an African-American supporter of Donald Trump who has been defending the candidate's recent outreach to minority voters in the media, tweeted a cartoon Monday of Hillary Clinton in blackface, mocking her outreach to black voters.

In the cartoon, Clinton is standing at a podium holding a sign reading, "#@!* the police" and, "I ain't no ways tired of pandering to African-Americans."

Serious algae outbreaks have hit more than 20 states this summer. Organisms are shutting down beaches in Florida, sickening swimmers in Utah and threatening ecosystems in California.

The blooms are a normal part of summer, but the frequency, size and toxicity this year are worse than ever.

And water managers are rattled.

"Everyone's on edge with the cyanobacteria," says Bev Anderson, a scientist with the California Water Resources Control Board.

Emails reporting outbreaks of cyanobacteria — or blue-green algae — fill Anderson's inbox every morning.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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David Sedaris Live in Akron

See David Sedaris at the Akron Civic on Oct. 16th

Tickets to this one-night event are now on sale!