photo of gun buyback
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Police Collect Nearly 170 Firearms During Cleveland's Annual Gun Buyback

The Cleveland Police Department collected 168 firearms during its gun buyback yesterday, with people lining up almost an hour in advance for the annual event. The 10th annual buyback allowed anyone to turn in a working handgun or semi-automatic rifle -- no questions asked -- for up to $200 in gift cards. As in years past, several private buyers lined up nearby with signs reading “Cash 4 Guns,” looking for interesting or historical pieces. Dan Smith from Streetsboro was there, and says gun...
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photo of gun buyback
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

The Cleveland Police Department collected 168 firearms during its gun buyback yesterday, with people lining up almost an hour in advance for the annual event.

The 10th annual buyback allowed anyone to turn in a working handgun or semi-automatic rifle -- no questions asked -- for up to $200 in gift cards.

photo of Borges and Sen. Rob Portman
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The head of the Ohio Republican Party is likely to have a challenger to his re-election to that position next month. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports.

Ohio Republican Party chair Matt Borges raised concerns about Donald Trump several times, and Trump’s campaign had blasted Borges personally at one point. Former Ohio Republican Party chair Kevin DeWine hinted a few weeks ago that Borges could be in trouble.

Senate President Keith Faber
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Senate has rejected a major appointment by Gov. John Kasich. As statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, this could be a sign of friction among Ohio’s top Republicans.

Months of tension between the Senate and Gov. Kasich over his nomination of Columbus lawyer Howard Petricoff to the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio culminated this week when a committee voted to reject Petricoff.

The Senate is called to advise and consent on gubernatorial nominations. Usually these committee votes are just a formality.

photo of Shadia Jallaq
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Center for American Women in Politics at Rutgers shows women, who make up more than half of the U.S. population, hold only about 20 percent of the seats in Congress and the U.S. Senate, and only slightly more than that in state legislatures. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles took a look at a program designed to encourage women to take the first step toward running for office.

Donald Trump victory in Cincinnati
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

President-elect Donald Trump was in Cincinnati last night at the first stop of what's billed as a thank you tour.

He drew heavily from his campaign, promising to drain the swamp of influence and power in Washington, to destroy ISIS in the Middle East, and to build a wall to stop illegal immigration. But he also promised to unite the nation.

photo of FERC
MARK URYCKI / IDEASTREAM

The NEXUS gas pipeline is not a done deal, but a federal environmental impact statement issued on Wednesday helps clear the way for the project’s construction.

The NEXUS gas pipeline could have some negative environmental effects, but mitigation measures could reduce the impact to “less than significant levels.” That’s according to the final environmental impact statement issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. 

The proposed natural gas pipeline stretches across more than 255 miles from eastern Ohio through Stark, Medina and Lorain counties and into Michigan.

Dan Horrigan and Clarence Tucker
Tim Rudell / WKSU

Akron has a new fire chief, the 19th in the 180-year history of the fire department.  It was a hire from within that Mayor Dan Horrigan says will help maintain continuity, stability and a commitment to community for one of the city’s most important services. 

In 1988, Clarence Tucker walked into Akron Fire Station No. 7 for his first day as a firefighter medic.  This week he walked into the same station to become chief of Akron’s 350 person Fire Department.

photo of Jon Husted
STATE OF OHIO

More than 1.87 million Ohioans voted early absentee, more than in any other election in state history.  Secretary of State Jon Husted has certified the results of the 2016 election, and even though polls showed the major party candidates were unpopular, turnout was topped 71 percent, more than a half a point higher than in 2012.

 

The Beatles' 1964 concert in Cleveland caused such a ruckus, the city banned the group in 1965. They returned in 1966 in a show sponsored by WIXY 1260 radio. Station owner Norman Wain says the backlash to John Lennon's "bigger than Jesus" comment, coupled with Cleveland Municipal Stadium's 80,000 seating capacity, made for a less-than-packed-house.

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The Ohio House has passed a bill that would acknowledge students with high second- language skills. Lawmakers hope the move will better advertise valuable job skills.

Hudson High School graduate, Kathleen Greer’s offered multi-lingual testimony in favor of the State Seal of Biliteracy. The seal would be an add-on to Ohio high-school diplomas showing high proficiency in a foreign language.

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When a robotic probe finally lands on a watery world like Jupiter's moon Europa, what do scientists have to see to definitively say whether the place has any life?

That's the question retired astronaut John Grunsfeld posed to some colleagues at NASA when he was in charge of the agency's science missions.

For more than a quarter century, two legislative districts in the state of North Carolina have been ground zero in a fight over race and redistricting. In the course of that time, Republicans have taken control of the state legislature, and the two political parties have reversed their legal positions regarding the use of race and drawing district lines.

A lawsuit on behalf of Alabama's prisoners, claiming they're being denied mental health care, begins in federal court Monday. The class-action suit states that Alabama doesn't provide adequate mental health treatment for those behind bars.

Lawyers for the prisoners argue that the state provides little other than medication, and sometimes inmates are forced to take it against their will. The plaintiffs allege prison conditions are dangerous and discriminatory, which amounts to cruel and unusual punishment, a violation of the Eighth Amendment.

Student parent.

Ever heard that term? It's used for a student who is also a parent, and there are nearly five million of them in colleges around the country. That's over a quarter of the undergraduate population, and that number has gone up by around a million since 2011.

It can be really, really expensive to be a student parent, especially if you need to pay for child care while you're in class.

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