'Luncheon In Fur': The Surrealist Teacup That Stirred The Art World

As the world celebrates one hundred years of dadaism, it is worth looking at how this "anti-art" art movement that started in a café in Zurich during World War I resulted in an iconic artwork involving that most humble object of tableware: the teacup.In 1936, a 23-year-old Swiss artist named Meret Oppenheim bought a teacup, saucer and spoon from a department store in Paris and wrapped them in the cream-and-tan pelt of a Chinese gazelle. Her hirsute little offering became a defining artifact...
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Federal indictments were unsealed today against the former president of Jimmy Haslam’s trucking company and seven other former executives and managers of Pilot Flying J.

But no where does the indictment list the Browns owner himself -- not even in a section on unindicted coconspirators.

The indictments say ex-President Mark Hazelwood and the others OK’d an expanded program to defraud small trucking companies who had been promised rebates as part of their fuel contracts. It says the fraud continued for five years.

Former Ohio state Sen. Nina Turner
WKSU

  A lot of Ohio Republicans have been in New Hampshire this week to campaign for Gov. John Kasich. But Ohio Democrats are also speaking out for their candidates.

Former State Sen. Nina Turner of Cleveland is among them. On CNN, she spoke about shifting her support from Hillary Clinton to Sen. Bernie Sanders.

New Hampshire Public Radio

Ohio Gov. John Kasich has “notched” his first win of his presidential run.

He and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders won the first tallied votes in the first-in-the-nation primary, those coming in from the nine voters in Dixville Notch.

Kasich, who has staked his hopes of being the GOP presidential nominee on New Hampshire beat Donald Trump 3-2. Sanders shut out Hillary Clinton, 4-0.

Meanwhile, Ohio voters are expressing some mixed feelings on Kasich’s run, including those who support him.

Photo of the seal of Cleveland City Council
The City of Cleveland

Top headlines: Man sentenced in the kidnapping and slaying of an elderly northeast Ohio couple; Number of prescriptions for painkillers continues to decline in Ohio; Security for Gov. John Kasich increases to more than $350,000 during presidential race

 

Morning headlines for Tuesday, February 9, 2016:

Rolled steel
WKSU

  The Columbus and Cincinnati areas have already recovered the jobs lost during the recession, however Greater Cleveland still hasn’t bounced back. A recent U.S. Conference of Mayors’ report say the region’s heavier reliance on manufacturing is a big reason. But one economist says there is another factor. 

PNC Bank economist Mekael Teshome says Cleveland-area manufacturing jobs are slowly returning, but that recovery is on two tracks.

Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis logo
Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis

 A new study is providing more ammunition for opponents against the so-called coal plant bailout proposed by two electric utilities. 

The report from the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis , or IEEFA, says FirstEnergy’s plan to guarantee a profit for their struggling coal plants would cost consumers $4 billion.

M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

It’s five weeks before Ohio’s primary, and so far, the presidential candidates and their issues seem far removed from many Ohioans’ lives. As WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports, that’s not just because those candidates have been spending all their time in New Hampshire.

Editor's note: We’ll be checking back with the B& K regularly though the 2016 election. And though this presidential field may seem more crowded than in years’ past, you can check at the bottom of this story to find some surprising parallels with the election of 1996.  

Sherrod Brown
U.S. SENATE

After a recent water scare in Sebring, Ohio and crisis in Flint, Mich., U.S. Sen.Sherrod Brown has introduced a bill aimed at addressing notification delays and readiness plans for communities hit with high lead levels in their drinking water supply.

Bald Eagle
National Wildlife Service / U.S. Wildlife website

The bald eagles have come back to Brecksville.  

The nesting pair has been returning to the Cuyahoga Valley National Park at about this time each year since 2006. 

The chief of visitor services, Jennie Vasarhely, says it is important for people who want to see the birds to keep their distance.  Getting too close disturbs the eagles so no one should approach the nesting area directly, or walk along the old railroad right-of-way that goes by it.

She says the return of the birds this year, and every year is very important. 

Alliance for Energy Choice
Alliance for Energy Choice

  Opponents of the so-called coal plant bailout proposed by two electric utilities are taking a big swing at the plan through a media blitz. 

“You want us to pay for what? This is crazy!”

So begins the ad by a  group of energy producers, known as the Alliance for Energy Choice, who are taking their fight against a price guarantee for AEP and FirstEnergy to the airwaves with radio and TV ads.

“They want a handout and they want you to hand it to them.”

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New Hampshire Primary Coverage

It’s the first-in-the-nation primary.

What will it mean to a still-crowded Republican field? And what of the close contest between Democrats Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders? Join us beginning at 8 p.m.

From NPR

In a further sign that Cuban baseball is in shambles, Cuban state media reports that two of the island's brightest stars left their team in Santo Domingo after competing in the Caribbean Series.

Lourdes Gourriel Jr., 22, and his older brother Yulieski, 31, left the team hotel in the early morning on Monday.

It's a Saturday night. Five couples sit sipping cocktails and beers. From the kitchen, the smell of ginger, fish oil and lime wafts into the dining room. Chef Josh Haynes is there preparing one of his signature recipes: a red curry of pumpkin and pork rib.

It could be a hip restaurant, except this is Haynes' apartment. In his small living room, with space for only two tables, 10 strangers eat his homemade Thai food.

Chess Wars: 20 Inmates, 5 Weeks, 1 Champion

44 minutes ago

In a prison hidden in the woods of Berlin, N.H., a group of 20 players are ready to compete for a chess tournament. They will sit in a windowless room engaged in a battle of the mind every Wednesday for five weeks — and one will be crowned the best player.

There are no prizes or trophies, merely a paper certificate for the winner, but for the inmates in this relatively isolated facility, the championship is a big deal.