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KELLEY NOTARO / Mughal art and food at CMA

The Art and Cuisine India's Emperors Enjoyed is at the Cleveland Museum of Art

The Cleveland Museum of Art is offering a look at the priceless art treasures of Indian emperors. Plus, a chance to feast like one. WKSU’s Vivian Goodman has the story in this week’s Quick Bite. The special exhibition “Art and Stories from Mughal India” is free to the public in celebration of the Cleveland Museum of Art’s centennial year. The Mughals governed India for 300 years from the 1500s until the start of British colonial rule. Curator Sonya Rhie Quintanilla says they were fabulously...
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STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio is used to getting a lot of attention when it comes to electing presidents. But some now question its status as a bellwether state for the future.  

Ohio usually predicts the winner in presidential elections. But University of Cincinnati political science Professor David Niven thinks that might not be the case this year.

“In this particular election, we may have slipped from our perch.”

Cleveland Convention Center
KEVIN NIEDERMIER / WKSU

The last few years have been good for the tourism and convention business in Northeast Ohio. Visitor and convention bureaus in Cleveland and Akron both report significant growth in 2015. 

Destination Cleveland says a record 17.6 million business and leisure travelers came to Cuyahoga County last year. That’s a nearly 4 percent increase over the year before and translates into an economic impact of more than $8 billion.

doug and menu
KELLEY NOTARO / Mughal art and food at CMA

The Cleveland Museum of Art is offering a look at the priceless art treasures of Indian emperors. Plus, a chance to feast like one. WKSU’s Vivian Goodman has the story in this week’s Quick Bite.

The special exhibition “Art and Stories from Mughal India” is free to the public in celebration of the Cleveland Museum of Art’s centennial year.

Jon Husted
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s Secretary of State is pushing Congress to pass a law that limits the federal government’s role in elections.

Secretary of State Jon Husted fears the Department of Homeland Security might somehow declare states' elections systems critical infrastructure and put them under federal control. So he wants a federal law to prevent that possibility from ever happening.

“All I’m asking them to do is clarify it in the law. If nobody wants it, then we should clearly say they can’t do it in law.”

Steve Loomis
M.L. SCHUTLZE / WKSU

  The 1,400 members of the Cleveland Police Patrolman's Association are due to cast ballots tomorrow as the union prepares to make an endorsement in the U.S. presidential race. But not all of the membership is on board with backing a candidate. Lynn Hampton, who heads a local association of African-American officers called Black Shield, doesn't think it's appropriate.

photo of Sherrod Brown
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

  The deal to head off a government shutdown this weekend includes hundreds of millions of dollars for the Great Lakes and drinking water systems. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports that Ohio’s Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown says it’s a good step, but broader investment is needed. 

 

Senate Democrats had threatened to block a short-term spending measure that takes effect Saturday unless House Republicans included money to address the Flint drinking water crisis.

Summit County Courthouse
WIKIPEDIA

A decade-long look at the quality-of-life in Summit County shows renewed optimism about jobs in greater Akron, even as concern over safety has risen in recent years.

photo of Attorney General Mike DeWine
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state’s top law enforcement official is urging communities to take advantage of all the programs available to help them fight the heroin epidemic in all parts of Ohio.

Attorney General Mike DeWine says the heroin unit in his office can help communities with equipment, staff and information to get bigger drug dealers off the street. But he says, so far, only a few have taken advantage of that service.

Bill Clinton in Cleveland
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

In less than two weeks, Ohio begins early voting. So once again, the candidates and their top surrogates are criss-crossing the battleground state. Next week, Hillary Clinton is in Ohio, and this past week, Bill Clinton and Mike Pence made their pitches here. WKSU and Ideastream political reporters M.L. Schultze and Nick Castele talk about the attempts to motivate voters.

Nick Castele and M.L. Schultze's weekly political roundup is part of WKSU and ideastream’s election collaborative.

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Shutterstock.com / Shutterstock

Ohio’s attorney general has launched a new program to try to protect the state’s businesses from being victimized by internet hackers.

The key part of Attorney General Mike DeWine’s new CyberOhio Initiative involves an advisory board, composed of business leaders and tech experts.

“The goal of CyberOhio is simple – to provide the best legal, technical and collaborative cyber security environment possible to help Ohio’s businesses thrive.”

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Reconnecting You with the Political Process

As part of the Ohio Media Project, WKSU will work to reframe how the 2016 campaigns are covered, restoring your voice in the process

David Sedaris Live in Akron

See David Sedaris at the Akron Civic on Oct. 16th

Tickets to this one-night event are now on sale!

From NPR

For the first time in almost 25 years, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs will pay for In Vitro Fertilization for wounded veterans.

As NPR's Quil Lawrence explains, Congress has reversed a law passed in 1992 that "prohibited the Department of Veterans Affairs from paying for IVF for veterans and their families." Quil tells our Newscast unit that "inside the stopgap spending bill passed this week is a provision to allow fertility treatments including IVF through VA health care." Here's more from Quil:

Both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump released their medical records earlier this month, and now it's Libertarian nominee Gary Johnson's turn to boast that he is "extremely physically fit."

The letter from the former New Mexico governor's physician, Dr. Lyle B. Amer of Santa Fe, explains that the 63-year-old Johnson's "decades of dedication to physical fitness, diet, no drinking, and no smoking have paid dividends as far as his current extraordinarily good health at this time of his life." (We'll come back to that smoking line).

It's been one year since health officials in Michigan warned people in the city of Flint to stop drinking the tap water after a research team from Virginia Tech discovered elevated lead levels.

To this day, Flint's water is still not safe to drink without a filter. While funding has been scarce to replace corroded pipes, Congress reached a deal this week that could send millions of dollars in aid to Flint.

It's one of the most famous delis in the U.S., if not the world; its food has been called "nearly orgasmic" — but now comes word that New York's famed Carnegie Delicatessen will be closing its doors at the end of 2016.

On Friday, New Orleans received new flood maps from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Overnight, more than half the population moved out of the so-called high-risk zone.

But with half the city at or below sea level and memories of massive flooding after Hurricane Katrina 11 years ago, some residents are worried these new maps send the wrong message.

More from NPR