Akron Fire Department Station 7
Tim Rudell / WKSU

Fire Officials Investigate Lack Of Smoke Detectors In Home Where A Fire Killed Four

The investigation continues into a house fire in Akron’s North Hill neighborhood that took the lives of two children and their parents. City and state fire codes require smoke detectors near the sleeping areas of a home, and in a rental house the owner must provide them. But, Lt. Sierjie Lash of the Akron Fire Department says that wasn’t the case in the residence on East Tallmadge Avenue that went up in flames in early on Saturday.
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Akron Fire Department Station 7
Tim Rudell / WKSU

The investigation continues into a house fire in Akron’s North Hill neighborhood that took the lives of two children and their parents.  

City and state fire codes require smoke detectors near the sleeping areas of a home, and in a rental house the owner must provide them. But, Lt. Sierjie Lash of the Akron Fire Department says that wasn’t the case in the residence on East Tallmadge Avenue that went up in flames in early on Saturday.

photo of Senator Frank LaRose
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A new bill is headed to the Ohio House to try to eliminate some of what its sponsor calls unnecessary primary elections.

The bill requires a special primary election only if two or more candidates are certified to appear on the ballot. It does not base primaries simply on how many people file to run – which is how it’s done now.

Republican State Sen. Frank LaRose says the reason for his bill is that candidates sometimes become ineligible – or even die – before the election is held, and the resulting uncontested special elections waste thousands of dollars.

Photo of Janet Porter
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Backers of the so-called heartbeat bill, which would ban abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected, are pressuring Ohio lawmakers to pass it during the lame-duck session. The chief advocate for the bill thinks lawmakers might be working behind the scenes on it.

The  heartbeat bill hasn’t moved in the Senate since it passed the House last year. But another bill that would ban abortions at 20 weeks is considered likely to pass in the lame-duck session.

photo of ECOT vs. ODE hearing
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state’s largest online charter school is fighting to keep up to $60 million that it could lose because of an enrollment audit that the school argues was improperly conducted by the state.

 

 

The state’s audit found that the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, or ECOT, only had about 40 percent of the full-time students enrolled than it reported.

 

photo of Justin Christian
CUYAHOGA COUNTY PROSECUTORS OFFICE

Police have arrested a suspect in the kidnapping and attempted abduction of two Northeast Ohio girls this year, an arrest that began with a new technology used by the state crime lab to  help identify 29-year-old Justin Christian.

City and county law enforcement had exhausted all of their leads in the case when Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine agreed to try software the state Bureau of Criminal Investigation had never used on an active case before -- “familial DNA search.”

SHUTTERSTOCK

There’s been a battle to change what employers pay into -- and what benefits workers get out of -- the state’s unemployment compensation fund. Now the bill to deal with that seems to be stalled at the Statehouse.

A legislative review of the latest proposal to shore up the fund found that it would increase employer taxes by just under 2 percent, but it would decrease worker benefits by more than 17 percent.

The bill was expected to get a vote out of committee, but at the last minute it was pulled. Republican Committee Chair Louis Blessing III announced the suprise move:

Cleveland logo
City of Cleveland

The City of Cleveland plans to create a Youth Crime Prevention and Reduction Department with some of the revenues from the income-ax increase voters passed last month. Details of the effort came today during a budget briefing before Cleveland City Council.   

Bob Hoch
City of Akron / City of Akron website

Akron 6th Ward City Councilman Bob Hoch is facing first-degree misdemeanor charges of conflict of interest.

In 2015, the administration of then-Mayor Don Plusquellic filed a complaint claiming Hoch voted on issues before council affecting members of his family. Hoch's sons work for the city's Fire Department and he voted on issues involving the department during the union's long court battle with the city over promotions. He has said he saw no conflict in his actions.

mugshot of Ronald Phillips
OHIO DEPARTMENT OF REHABILITATION AND CORRECTION

The first man scheduled to be put to death in Ohio since a problematic execution almost three years ago is asking for life without parole. The clemency hearing for Ronald Phillips was held yesterday.

Forty-year-old Ronald Phillips of Akron was sentenced to die for the rape and murder of his girlfriend’s 3-year-old daughter Sheila Marie Evans in 1993, when he was 19. Attorneys for Phillips spent six hours before the parole board restating the case for sparing Phillips, which hinges on his abusive upbringing and his reformation into a better person behind bars. 

Mayor Gary Norton
WKYC

Residents of financially troubled East Cleveland will go to the polls tomorrow to vote on whether or not to recall the city’s mayor and city council president.

This will be the second time this year Mayor Gary Norton faces a recall attempt. An effort to unseat him failed last spring because not enough signatures were collected to put the issue on the ballot.

Council President Thomas Wheeler has survived two recall efforts. Tuesday’s special election will cost the cash-scrapped city $30,000.

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From NPR

Frequent removal of pubic hair is associated with an increased risk for herpes, syphilis and human papillomavirus, doctors at the University of California, San Francisco, reported Monday in the journal Sexually Transmitted Infections.

The manager of the Oakland, Calif., warehouse that burned down, killing at least 36 people, apologized for the devastation while defending his vision for the "Ghost Ship" artists' collective during an agonized, frequently tense interview on the Today show.

After Matt Lauer welcomed him with "good morning," Derick Almena shook his head.

"It's not a good morning," he said. "What am I doing here? Can I just say I'm sorry?"

It's a policy battle that has been playing out over three decades.

In 1984. then-President Ronald Reagan imposed an anti-abortion rule — known as the "Mexico City policy" after the city where he announced it. The rule blocked federal funding for international family planning charities unless they agreed not to "promote" abortion by, among other actions, providing patients with information about the procedure or referrals to providers who perform it.

Sarah Lohman has made everything from colonial-era cocktails to cakes with black pepper to stewed moose face. She is a historical gastronomist, which means she re-creates historical recipes to connect with the past.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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