MARC MEYERS

"My Friend Dahmer" Premieres at the Tribeca Film Festival: A Conversation With Author Derf

The film version of the graphic novel "My Friend Dahmer" opens tonight at New York’s Tribeca Film Festival. Author John Backderf went to high school with Jeffrey Dahmer, and his book is a recollection of their teen years before Dahmer became a serial killer. He paints a nuanced portrait of Dahmer’s slow slide into depravity in 1970’s Ohio.

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photo of Tracy Plouck
DANIEL KONIK / OGT

The most recent figures on drug overdoses in Ohio are from 2015, when more than 3,000 Ohioans died. And last year’s numbers are expected to be worse. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler talked to the head of the state’s drug-addiction agency about the state budget and what it means for the opioid epidemic.

Leedco wind farm
WKSU

Lakewood City Council is supporting the proposed Icebreaker wind farm in Lake Erie, which would be about 7  miles offshore from Lakewood.

Council passed a resolution that cites Ohio’s over-dependence on fossil fuels and a potential economic boost for the city.

photo of Escher String Quartet
SOPHIE ZHAI

The city of Akron and Tuesday Musical want to help the city relax using classical music. WKSU’s Phil de Oliveira reports on a new initiative to bring live chamber music to Akron’s public spaces.

The free, 45-minute concerts are part of a series called Decompression Chamber. The idea for the concerts came out of research suggesting classical music decreases stress and enhances brain function.

Pipeline sections
M.L. Schultze / WKSU

A week ago,  an estimated 1.5 million gallons of a fluid used in drilling the underground pathway for the Rover gas pipeline spilled in southwestern Stark County. The accident was in an area where Canton has shallow wells for its water supply.  

photo of drug protest in Columbus
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

April 20th is a day widely celebrated by those in favor of legalizing marijuana. But as Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports, hundreds of high school students from around Ohio have a different message.

A sea of high school students in purple tee shirts marched down the street to the Statehouse. Delaney McQuown, a senior at Upper Sandusky High School, says the message is simple: Don’t do drugs.

“Marijuana is definitely a gateway drug and although people say it’s not a drug, it really is and it affects your brain and body in ways you don’t understand," she says.

photo of Kathy Hanratty
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

A proposed amendment to the state budget has some people asking whether it would allow probate court judges to penalize people who “interfere with a park district’s purposes" -- including, potentially, protesters.

JOHN ALLER
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Ohio is getting $26 million from the federal government to help fight the opioid epidemic. 

The CURES Act passed in the waning days of the Obama administration and promised a billion dollars over two years to improve monitoring, prevention and treatment. This week, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced the first round of $485 million in grants to states.

The Cleveland Browns head to Philadelphia next week with the first pick in the NFL Draft. At a press conference yesterday, Browns Vice President Sashi Brown says he feels good about picking at No. 1 but would not say if the team had decided who it will select. Brown spoke positively of his meeting with Texas A&M’s Myles Garrett.

The Stevens Laboratory, University of Sou / NIH

The state law passed last year allowing a medical marijuana industry in Ohio gives communities a limited ability to regulate it in their areas. To get a state permit, a company must show it can comply with zoning and other ordinances where it will operate. But, as a deadline nears for applying for the first state permits, rules for doing business in Akron aren’t set.  

Mayor Dan Horrigan introduced Akron’s licensing plan to City Council this week. His press secretary, Ellen Lander-Nischt, says passage is probably a few weeks off. 

photo of Mike DeWine
ANDY CHOW / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

Editor's Note: The headline on this story has been changed; DeWine's office says his nod was not meant to  indicate he thinks money from the rainy-day fund should go toward the opioid battle.

Ohio’s opioid crisis has been tearing through the state. For months, Democrats have been calling on Gov. John Kasich to release rainy day funds to aid in the fight. One  of the Republicans who want to replace him says he'd be open to that.

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From NPR

At Seneca Sawmill Company in Eugene, Ore., a team of lumbermen stand watch as wooden boards are spit out one-by-one onto a planing platform.

"We're taking rough lumber from the saw mill, bringing it over and putting a smooth surface on all four sides and then grading it based on lumber grading rules," explains Todd Payne, Seneca's CEO.

Payne says his business is thriving. A "now hiring" sign even hangs out front. Seneca Sawmill has weathered the past few decades better than many of Oregon's other timber operations.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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