Cleveland Indians
Cleveland Indians

The View From Pluto: Indians' Success Is Vindication For Owner Paul Dolan

The Indians are riding a high heading into the postseason. They’ve won their second consecutive American League Central Division title, fueled by a historic 22-game winning streak. WKSU commentator Terry Pluto says it’s vindication for Indians owner, Paul Dolan. "Dolans are cheap; that's all you hear," Pluto says. After last year's World Series run, the team raised its payroll from $97 million to $130 million, which is around the league average. Still, Pluto says, he gets emails from fans...

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photo of puppy mill bill hearing
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Opponents of commercial dog-breeding facilities known as puppy mills say the state’s current laws don’t protect animals enough. So they are trying to put an issue before Ohio voters to let them decide. 

The group Stop Puppy Mills Ohio has received approval for language for a proposed constitutional amendment they say would make commercial dog breeding more humane. It would limit the number of litters a female dog could produce in her lifetime, and it would also spell out care standards for puppies and breeder dogs.

A Cleveland-based developer focused on affordable housing is looking to change its designation to better help low-income families get home loans.

The move by CHN Housing Partners is an attempt to address what are known as mortgage deserts.

CHN Executive Director Rob Curry says that his group wants to focus on communities where very few people qualify for residential mortgages.

“Housing values cannot recover unless there is a flow of mortgages into a neighborhood, a flow of capital,” says Curry.

photo of Mary Taylor
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

One of the Republican candidates for governor, Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor, unveiled a set of proposals for health care in Ohio today. Taylor prefers a system that’s gaining popularity among the GOP.

Taylor wants to switch to a direct primary-care system. Regular doctor visits would be covered by a monthly membership, through which patients pay a flat monthly fee to a doctor or company who provides the routine services. Insurance plans would be designated primarily for catastrophic coverage.

Taylor says direct primary care is already proven in some states where it’s being tried.

photo of Lake Erie algae bloom
ELIZABETH MILLER / IDEASTREAM

Western Lake Erie’s algae bloom is in full swing – and the water is a sickly green.  

A t Maumee Bay State Park near Toledo, Ohio, the lake looks like it’s covered in paint. Thick lines of scum swirl around as the sun beats down.

Charter boat Capt. Don McGee takes a group of students and reporters to the middle of the lake to describe what’s floating around.  He’s fished Lake Erie for over 30 years. He says it isn’t going to get healthy overnight, but more needs to be done.

photo of gun-free zone
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A bill is moving through the Ohio House that would let off duty police officers carry weapons into gun-free zones. This bill has the support of police officers.

The Ohio Fraternal Order of Police says officers always have a responsibility to take action whether they’re on duty or not. And the union is advocating for a bill it says will help protect gun-free zones from attackers.

Opponents say the proposal violates the rights of property owners who make the decision to restrict guns.

The November election is about 50 days away, with no major statewide candidates this year. That leaves room for both sides of a controversial drug price issue on the ballot to hit the airwaves with millions of dollars in ads. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler sat down with leaders from both sides to debate Issue 2.

Issue 2 may turn out to be the most expensive ballot issue campaign in Ohio history, topping the $64 million casino effort in 2008. The debate over drug prices has spawned a huge ad campaign, and is one of the most contentious issues in recent years.

Mark Arehart / WKSU

A new shopping space in downtown Akron set to open next month is betting big on small businesses.

photo of Ohio State Fair
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, September 18th:

photo of Geauga Lake plaque
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Geauga Lake Amusement Park closed ten years ago. Community members gathered on the site over the weekend to unveil a plaque commemorating it.

The roller coasters and rides on the shores of Geauga Lake fell silent for the last time on September 16, 2007, a week before owner Cedar Fair announced that the park would never re-open. For the past decade, it’s been fenced-off and decaying as ideas for re-developing the property have been proposed but never actually implemented.

DIMITRIS KALOGEROPOYLOS / FLICKR

John Carroll University is getting a $1.3 million federal grant to train graduate students as counselors in the battle against opioids.

The grants from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services go to medically underserved areas where people lack access to primary care or have high instances of infant mortality, mental health issues or drug abuse. Over the next four years, John Carroll will use the grant to place 80 grad students in some of those medically underserved areas.

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From NPR

A dispute over a $75 speeding ticket has climbed through the levels of Iowa's court system, reaching the lofty heights of the Iowa Supreme Court for oral arguments.

Marla Leaf got a speeding ticket because a camera allegedly caught her driving 68 mph in a 55-mph zone on an interstate freeway through the city of Cedar Rapids in February 2015.

Comedian Jimmy Kimmel thwacked the latest Republican health care proposal Tuesday night after one of the senators sponsoring the bill invoked Kimmel's name.

Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., touted Tuesday on Capitol Hill that his plan passes the "Jimmy Kimmel test."

For the first time, scientists have edited the DNA in human embryos to make a fundamental discovery about the earliest days of human development.

By modifying a key gene in very early-stage embryos, the researchers demonstrated that a gene plays a crucial role in making sure embryos develop normally, the scientists say.

Updated at 1:09 p.m. ET

As the morning sun rose over the cities of Central Mexico on Wednesday, where city blocks had lain neatly arranged, there was now a mess of rubble and stunned residents, watching as thousands of earthquake volunteers and rescue workers dug through scattered stones searching for signs of life.

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