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The View From Pluto: For Cavs Owner Dan Gilbert, Winning Has No Price Too High

Winning has no price tag for Cavs owner Dan Gilbert. The team’s recent roster overhaul boosted the team’s payroll to nearly $190 million this season, the second-highest in NBA history. And that payroll could soar to $300 million should LeBron James return to the Cavs next season. Nearly half of that would be spent on a luxury tax for exceeding the NBA’s salary cap. WKSU commentator Terry Pluto says Gilbert has had no hesitation spending money, especially when it means getting -- and perhaps...

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Winning has no price tag for Cavs owner Dan Gilbert. The team’s recent roster overhaul boosted the team’s payroll to nearly $190 million this season, the second-highest in NBA history. And that payroll could soar to $300 million should LeBron James return to the Cavs next season. Nearly half of that would be spent on a luxury tax for exceeding the NBA’s salary cap.

photo of Gov. John Kasich
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. John Kasich appears to have changed his views on gun regulations, after years of saying he was a strong Second Amendment supporter on the rare occasions that he talked about it at all.

A photo of Venture Products, Inc.
VENTURE PRODUCTS, INC. / VENTURE PRODUCTS, INC.

An Orville manufacturer is playing a small part in this year’s Winter Olympics.

Venture Products produces Ventrac tractors, which can be used for, among other things, clearing snow.  A South Korean contractor is using them to remove snow from areas around the Olympics stadium.

Venture Products CEO Dallas Steiner says this opportunity wouldn’t be possible if it weren’t for his employees.

A photo of Husted and Sykes.
KAREN KASLER / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A plan to change the way the state’s map of Congressional districts will be drawn after the 2020 census will be on the May ballot as Issue 1. 

Keith Faber
ANDREW MEYER / WKSU public radio

State auditor candidate Keith Faber criticized Ohio’s medical marijuana roll-out today at the Akron Press Club. 

Richard Cordray
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

One of the leading Democratic candidates for governor – who has earned top ratings from the NRA and state gun groups – laid out his gun platform today. It includes universal background checks, a crackdown on illegal gun purchases and a ban on bump stocks. As WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports, Richard Cordray also took a tentative step toward restricting assault-style weapons.

A photo of Sen. Joe Schiavoni (D-Youngstown).
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The bill to overhaul the state’s education system and hand more control over to the governor’s office is getting its first committee hearing. Opponents say this measure strips away local control and one senator sees similarities to another controversial bill from a few years ago.

In June 2015, lawmakers added last minute changes to a bill that led to the Youngstown City School District takeover by the state.

A photo of Senate President Larry Obhof.
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

There are 22 bills related to guns pending in the Ohio Legislature right now. It’s hard to predict what might happen to them after the deadly Florida school shooting last week and Gov. John Kasich’s new willingness to embrace some gun regulations.

Republican Senate President Larry Obhof isn’t saying what will happen with gun bills in the days following the deaths of 17 people at a high school in Florida. But he says lawmakers are considering ways to beef up security in Ohio’s schools.

A photo of Chief Mark Brink and Superintendent Christopher DiLoreto.
WKYC / WKYC

Authorities in Stark County have released some additional details on the shooting at Jackson Middle School this morning. 

Jackson Township Police Chief Mark Brink says a seventh-grade student shot himself in a school restroom. The chief says the unidentified student was carrying a long gun and “distractionary devices.”

Brink says the student was taken to the hospital by the fire department. It is unclear where he shot himself. No one else was injured.

Photo of Melissa Ackison
MELISSA ACKISON FOR US SENATE CAMPAIGN

There are ten weeks till the May primary and while the Ohio Republican Party has already voted to endorse Jim Renacci as their U.S. Senate nominee, there are other candidates – including Melissa Ackison, who says she’s a political outsider. 

Melissa Ackison, of Marysville, became a vocal critic of the Affordable Care Act because of the effect she says it had on her as a small business owner and as someone with a rare disease trying to find coverage.

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From NPR

Threats Against Schools Increase Since Florida Shooting

1 hour ago

Since last week's school shooting in Parkland, Fla., the number of threats of violence against schools across the country has increased.

Educators School Safety Network says it recorded about 50 threats a day on average since the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where 17 people died.

The Ohio-based national organization that tracks school threats says that compares to about 10 threats a day on average.

One week after the deadly shooting at a high school in Parkland, Fla., that killed 17 people, lawmakers and a representative of the National Rifle Association faced tough questions from students, teachers and parents at a CNN town hall meeting to discuss how to prevent such tragedies in the future.

Florida Sens. Marco Rubio, a Republican, and Bill Nelson, a Democrat, and U.S. Rep. Ted Deutch, D-Fla., started by answering parents and students at the event in Sunrise.

In the Balkan state of Montenegro, an unidentified man threw a hand grenade at the U.S. Embassy in the capital before then killing himself with another explosive, according to The Associated Press.

The building in Podgorica was not damaged and no one else was injured, according to a State Department spokesman.

The motive for the attack is not known yet, and it is also not know if it was meant to be a suicide attack.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

A week after 17 people were killed at a Parkland, Fla., high school, President Trump hosted survivors, parents and teachers from that and other recent school shooting tragedies for an emotional, nearly 90-minute listening session at the White House Wednesday.

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