Mark Arehart / WKSU

State of the Arts: Jun Kaneko's Giant, Colorful Ceramics Transform The Akron Art Museum

Artist Jun Kaneko ’s work can be seen from New York to Tokyo. He’s known for his larger-than-life ceramic sculptures. Now you can see them in Akron.

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photo of Matt Hectorne
DAVE KOEN

Singer-songwriter Matt Hectorne was raised in the South but now calls Northeast Ohio home. His latest album, “Work,” explores the challenges of living as a married musician often on the road.

The album’s direct, one-word title refers to Hectorne’s own efforts to build a career and improve himself. Hectorne was born in Memphis and raised in Mississippi, but he grew weary of small-town life and eventually ended up in the Cleveland area.

M.L. SCHULTZE
WKSU / HEISER AND PACHISIA

More than a dozen Silicon Valley venture capitalists are taking a closer look this week at what are often dismissed as rust-belt cities: places like Youngstown, Akron and Detroit. They’re trying to figure out if there’s a match to be made with their money and the region’s strengths. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports on the Akron stop on what’s being called the Comeback Cities tour.

The smell of the city’s rubber history still lingers in the stairwells in the old B.F. Goodrich plant on the south side of Akron’s downtown.

Mark Arehart / WKSU

Akron Public Schools announced it’s expanding its college and career academies through a partnership with Kent State University.

Candidates for governor sign papers
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The list of candidates who will appear on the May 8 primary ballot for governor is officially set. It includes a surprise.

Another Democrat is out of the gubernatorial race. Jon Heavey, a doctor from Cleveland, did not collect enough valid signatures to get on the ballot, though he had filed a financial statement giving himself a campaign loan of $1.5 million. Efforts to reach him for comment weren’t successful.

NPR

WKSU is co-sponsoring a live edition of the NPR Politics Podcast this Friday in Cleveland.

It features NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith, along with podcast partner Scott Detrow, political reporter Asma Khalid, and editor Domenico Montanaro.

Keith has an Ohio connection. She was a reporter at WOSU in Columbus providing local coverage of the 2004 presidential election. 

Keith says, while not every contest hinges on Ohio, we're still an important battleground state.

AUDITOR DAVID YOST
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s Auditor says it’s probably too late for the state Department of Commerce to pause its medical marijuana processes to fix problems. He’s telling the department to focus now instead on defending lawsuits.

Back in December, just days after it was discovered that the state hired a man with a felony drug conviction to score medical marijuana applications, Auditor Dave Yost called for the process to stop.

Lakewood High School
Wikipedia.com

Northeast Ohio high school students joined their counterparts nationwide, calling on Congressional leaders to take action to stop gun violence in the nation’s schools.

Students at Lakewood High School walked out of their classrooms at noon and marched laps around their campus, chanting:

“No NRA, No KKK, No facists USA and holding signs that read, “Silence never solved anything.”

Brooklyn solar array savings
Andrew Atkins / Info from the IGS Solar Press Release

Cuyahoga County will soon be home to one of the largest solar arrays in Ohio. IGS Solar will build the farm on 17 acres of a 75-acre landfill in Brooklyn.

Patrick Smith, vice president of sales for IGS Solar, says the company views the project as an opportunity.

“We really see this as an opportunity for solar to be showcased in a non-traditional format using a landfill, which is really land that can’t be utilized for any other commercial purpose.”

Mark Brink
Screenshot

The 13-year-old who shot himself at Jackson Middle School yesterday has died.

Jackson Police Chief Mark Brink held a news conference announcing Keith Simons died this afternoon at an Akron hospital. Brink says authorities are not ruling the death a suicide at this point.

The chief says they are still investigating how Simons was able to get a .22 rifle onto his bus and into the school.

photo of Board of Education member Morgan Lasher
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

 

Fifty-seven people were interested in the opening on the Akron Board of Education following the resignation of John Otterman last month.  He stepped down following allegations of drug use and an overdose. Tuesday, the board picked Otterman’s replacement.

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From NPR

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It's not called a snail's pace for nothing, but just how slow is too slow for the mollusk to move? According to a pub in England, hibernation is where they draw the line.

The Dartmoor Union Inn in Devon was promoting a snail racing championship for Saturday, promising guests, "each thrilling race will last about 4 minutes with guests able to bet on their favourite snail."

Proceeds would go toward city emergency services.

Except it's so cold in the United Kingdom that even the snails are hunkering down.

When Boko Haram extremists snatched 276 girls from a boarding school in northeast Nigeria in 2014, the world reacted and rallied around the cry of "bring back our girls." But now, some four years later, it appears to be happening again.

Since this frightened mom crossed the border with her son in early 2017, fleeing gang violence in El Salvador, she has felt bewildered by the vast complicated immigration system in the United States.

NPR is not using her name for her protection.

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