Collection of the artist. Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo/Singapore; Victoria Miro, London; David Zwirner, New York. © Yayoi Kusama

State of the Arts: Kusama's 'Infinity Mirrors' Comes to Cleveland

It took more than 50 years for Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama to finally get the recognition her male counterparts gained in the 1960s. Now people in Northeast Ohio can take in her work for themselves. On this week’s State of the Arts, WKSU’s Mark Arehart goes to the Cleveland Museum of Art and steps into Yayoi Kusama's "Infinity Mirrors.”

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Cleveland entrepreneurs have a chance to expand both their knowledge and their businesses this fall.

JumpStart is seeking applications for its sixth class of the Core City: Cleveland Impact Program. For 12 weeks, five entrepreneurs will receive one-on-one mentoring from two advisors and compete for a $10,000 cash prize.

photo of rainy day fund presentation
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state has deposited more than $650 million into the rainy day fund. Despite being a large pot of money, Gov. John Kasich is warning state leaders to leave it alone.

Focusing on adding money to the budget stabilization fund, also known as the rainy day fund, has been a priority for Kasich since taking office. Now the state has slightly less than $2.7 billion in its reserve.

Kasich urges that this money is only to help cushion the fall from an economic downturn.

photo of Mike DeWine and Jon Husted
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

For the first time, the Republican candidate for governor is stating clearly that he would keep Medicaid expansion for all 700,000 Ohioans covered under it. Mike DeWine says he’s been supportive all along, but his opponent says that’s not true.

While accepting the endorsement of the Ohio State Medical Association, DeWine said he’d keep Medicaid expansion but that he’d reform it, including adding work requirements and wellness incentive programs.

photo of Your Choice Healthcare Clinic Columbus
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A new clinic on Columbus’s north side is providing women’s health services, including medication that causes abortions. Some, including anti-abortion advocates, are calling it an abortion clinic. The organization that lobbies on behalf of abortion providers says it isn’t.

photo of Sen. Rob Portman and Sen. Sherrod Brown
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

On Friday, Ohio’s two U.S. senators will hear from workers, retirees and employers whose pension plans are facing a financial crisis.

A joint House and Senate committee is trying to figure out how to rescue plans that benefit Teamsters, miners, carpenters and other union workers. The pensions took financial hits during the recession and have big liabilities coming due as people retire.

photo of FirstEnergy building
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, July 11: 

LeBron James’ next chapter officially begins this week. The former Cavs star signed his 4-year, nearly $154 million contract with the L.A. Lakers on Monday. But is he really going to be happy in his new home?

WKSU commentator Terry Pluto says James has been used to teaming up with marquee players, and this Lakers team is lacking a strong supporting cast.

William Rich at the podium flanked by Mayors Horrigan, Kline, Walters, Akron Council President Summereville, Mayor Adamson and County Exdcutive Shapiro
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

The idea of moving Summit County’s primary election from September to earlier in the year is running into some opposition in Akron City Council. 

A week ago, the mayors of Akron and four nearby cities along with the county executive called for holding the local primary the same day as the state primary in May.

But Akron City Council member Bruce Kilby says that would hurt political newcomers and candidates without their party's backing.

photo of Senate Finance Committee
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A bill to overhaul the payday lending industry in Ohio is heading back to the House after the Senate approved the legislation with some changes. Consumer advocates are touting this as sensible reform while lenders argue this will put them out of business. 

An art rendering of The Music Settlement's new building in Ohio City.
Courtesy of The Music Settlement

The Music Settlement, a longtime music therapy and education institution in Cleveland’s University Circle, is opening a new Ohio City Campus later this summer.

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Patients whose blood cancers have failed to respond to repeated rounds of chemotherapy may be candidates for a new type of gene therapy that could send their cancers into remission for years. But the two approved therapies, with price tags of hundreds of thousands of dollars, have roiled the insurance approval process, leading to delays and, in some cases, denials of coverage, clinicians and analysts say.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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