Cleveland Orchestra
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Shuffle: The Highlights, The Lowlights And The Challenges Of The Cleveland Orchestra’s 100th Season

The Cleveland Orchestra 's 100th season will be busy and challenging. In this week's Shuffle, Cleveland.com classical music critic Zach Lewis says there's a lot to like, but there are also many uncertainties:

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GOOGLE EARTH

The outline of President Trump’s 2018 budget is out – and it eliminates the $300 million in annual funding for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, which finances environmental projects all over the region.

Trump’s budget calls for a 31 percent decrease in funding for the Environmental Protection Agency – the biggest cut of any agency.  In addition to cutting 3,200 employees, the proposal eliminates funding for other projects – including Chesapeake Bay restoration and climate change research.

The Ohio Weather Band
The Ohio Weather Band

The classic rock band Bon Jovi is back in Northeast Ohio this week. They’ll be at Quicken Loans Arena this weekend.

The gig is also giving a smaller local band a chance to reach a bigger audience. In this week's Shuffle, Akron Beacon Journal pop music writer Malcolm Abram talks about The Ohio Weather Band's big break. 

Paolo DeMaria
Ohio Department of Education

Ohio high school students may be able to earn a diploma without relying solely on test scores. A work group assembled to study Ohio’s graduation requirements will is meeting this week  to refine five new options.

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IBERDROLA RENEWABLES

House Republicans are sending a message to Gov. John Kasich by moving a bill that would effectively kill green-energy standards in Ohio. This is similar to a bill Kasich vetoed last year and he isn’t afraid to use that veto pen again.

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WCPN

The Ohio school superintendent plans to hold off on submitting the state’s new education plan to the federal government next month.  The move comes the same day that the U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced that states would have much more flexibility.

Secretary DeVos and Congress are stripping away many of the requirements of the federal Every Student Succeeds Act or ESSA.  She dropped one that required the states to take input from stakeholders such as educators and parents. 

Injecting opioids
FLICKR CC

The non-partisan Congressional Budget Office is predicting that 14 million Americans who have health insurance under Obamacare could lose that coverage in the first year of the Republican replacement. That plan could also have a big impact on people seeking help for opioid addiction.

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STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

State lawmakers who want Ohio to join a group of states in calling for a constitutional convention brought in some conservative star power to make their case.

KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Akron and Summit County are getting funding to try a new way to reduce jail overcrowding.

The funding comes from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation’s Safety and Justice Challenge. It helps local jurisdictions test innovative reforms to reduce over-incarceration.

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KAREN KASLER / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

A resolution that would make Ohio the 10th state to demand a convention of states to amend the U.S. Constitution is raising concerns among some state lawmakers.

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ANDY CHOW / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

Gov. John Kasich will celebrate the biggest win in his presidential campaign tonight.

It was one year ago when John Kasich won his only presidential primary – Ohio’s.

“We are going to go all the way to Cleveland and secure the Republican nomination!” he declared on March 15, 2016,

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From NPR

There's no denying it: Los Angeles isn't exactly gentle on the ears.

That's one lesson, at least, from a comprehensive noise map created by the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics. On the interactive U.S. map the agency released this week, which depicts data on noise produced primarily by airports and interstate highways, few spots glare with such deep and angry color as the City of Angels.

It was a meeting of nerds and sharks.

The self-described "biotech nerds" and "robotic nerds" were seven high school students from Washington, D.C. The eight teens who call themselves "sharks" and flew in from Ghana. "The shark is a big fish so it means you're big. Knowledgeable," explains Stephanie Obbo of Ghana, an aspiring medical doctor.

Almost three years ago, the ferry Sewol sank in rough seas off South Korea. More than 300 people perished, mostly high school students on a field trip.

Now, South Korea's government is trying to raise what's left of the 6,800-ton ship. As NPR's Elise Hu reports from Seoul, nine of the people who were aboard that day in April 2014 remain missing, and families hope to recover those bodies once the Sewol has been lifted out of the water and put in dry dock.

Dozens of divers are involved in the salvage operation, Elise says.

When House Speaker Paul Ryan says he wants to repeal the Affordable Care Act so that people can buy insurance that's right for them, and not something created in Washington, part of what he's saying is that he wants to get rid of so-called essential health benefits.

That's a list of 10 general categories of medical care that all insurance policies are required to cover under the Affordable Care Act.

Updated at 3:35 p.m. ET

On the final day of the confirmation hearings for Judge Neil Gorsuch, the Senate Democratic leader announced his opposition to the Supreme Court nominee.

In a speech on the Senate floor, Chuck Schumer said Gorsuch "will have to earn 60 votes for confirmation," setting up a showdown with Republican leaders who may attempt to change Senate rules.

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