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Monogamy and Smiles are the Results of a Neurochemical Change That Made Us Human

One of the most enduring questions in science is how did we become human. Fossil bones of our ancestors tell part of the story. But researchers at Kent State University have discovered another piece of the puzzle by comparing the brains of humans with other primates. In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at the neurochemical changes in our distant past that became the turning point in human evolution.

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photo of Bethany Svoboda and Dan Socha
DAN SOCHA

Two northeast Ohio songwriters who spent years on their own are starting a new band, as a couple. For this week’s Shuffle, WKSU contributor Brittany Nader talked with Dan Socha and Bethany Svoboda about finding a new role for men and women in musical spaces.

Harmonizing old tunes
Making beautiful music isn’t just a well-worn euphemism for romance.

photo of Sherrod Brown
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown says he can provide as many as two-dozen Democratic votes if the Trump administration’s renegotiation of NAFTA includes the right protections for workers.  WKSU’s M.L. Schultze has more on yesterday’s trade meeting.

Connie Pillich and Rich Cordray
Dan Konik / Statehouse News

The only woman who was still running for the Democratic nomination for governor has dropped out of the race. And as Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports, she’s throwing her support to a man she’d once criticized, but who many consider to be the front runner in the party’s primary.

Rep. Bill Reineke stands at podium
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

House Republicans rolled out a plan that would overhaul the state’s education system by consolidating several departments into one umbrella organization – including the Ohio Department of Education and of Higher Education. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, supporters say this will bolster the connection between education and career-readiness.

Opioid prescriptions
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, Feb. 14:

Cleveland Cavaliers

The new-look Cavs are rejuvenated nearly one week after overhauling the roster. The Cavs have won back-to-back games since trading six players and adding four new ones. WKSU commentator Terry Pluto says the Cavs instantly improved once they unloaded veterans like Isaiah Thomas and Dwyane Wade.

A photo of opioid pain pills.
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

It’ll be a while before the state puts out new official numbers on Ohio’s deadly opioid crisis. But the federal Centers for Disease Control says it has new stats that show the epidemic is nowhere close to slowing down.

A photo of (clockwise, starting bottom left) Doug Cole, Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor and Marion Little.
THE OHIO CHANNEL / THE OHIO CHANNEL

Attorneys for the now-closed Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow and the Ohio Department of Education traded jabs before the Ohio Supreme Court over how the state should fund schools and if that funding should be tied to just enrollment or student participation. 

Police academy training for combative situations
Tim Rudell / WKSU

As veteran officers retire from Ohio police departments millennials, who now comprise the largest living generation, are increasingly being looked to in order to fill their jobs. The question is, are they really interested in that type of work? 

photo of David James
M.L. SCHUTLZE / WKSU public radio

Akron Superintendent David James took the question of student discipline head-on during his state of the schools address today . As WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports  James says allegations of students assaulting teachers are far more complex and far fewer in number than grievances filed by the teachers’ union might indicate.

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From NPR

Botanist David Fairchild grew up in Kansas at the end of the 19th century. He loved plants, and he loved travel, and he found a way to combine both into a job for the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

An outside legal review of NPR's handling of allegations against its former top news executive, Michael Oreskes, found that questions were raised about his behavior toward women even before he was hired. And concerns about misconduct were reportedly flagged throughout Oreskes' 2 1/2-year tenure at the network right up to the day he was fired.

Venezuela's downward economic spiral has led to widespread food shortages, hyperinflation and now mass migration. Many Venezuelans are opting for the easiest escape route — by crossing the land border into Colombia.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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