Shawn Brewster

Shuffle: Cleveland Female Musicians Take Center Stage To Benefit Women In Need

A group of female-fronted bands in Cleveland is coming together for a cause. The second annual Women Rock CLE concert at the House of Blues next month was organized by the roots rock band AJ & The Woods , fronted by musican Alison Tomin. Tomin says the show on July 6th is all about rallying around women -- from the bands on the bill to the proceeds that will go to Laura’s Home , a Cleveland shelter for women and children. She says the idea actually came from one of the male members of her...

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WIKIPEDIA

If a pilot program at Wright State University were expanded to all of Ohio’s public colleges and universities, it could save students some $300 million a year. That’s according to the head of Wright State’s Task Force on Affordability and Efficiency, professor Dan Krane.

City of Cleveland

The Cuyahoga County Animal Shelter is still waiting for test results to determine what killed five dogs last month.

Samples of the unknown respiratory illness were sent to state labs which have yet to identify the disease. Five dogs sent from the city kennel to a Valley View dog shelter died of the illness.

A city spokesperson said the kennel has revisited its cleaning protocols as a precaution. This includes disinfecting the kennel and the animal control officer’s truck. He says no other dogs have died.

Photo of Akron
Tim Rudell / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, June 19:

Curtis Harbour has trained his service dog Max to respond with love when Harbour feels stressed.
Mark Arehart / WKSU

One of the barriers to finding the right mental health care in Ohio can be the cost. However, there are providers who offer services at little or no cost to low-income clients. In this installment of our series "Navigating the Path to Mental Health," WKSU’s Mark Arehart looks at the financial challenges facing both patients and providers.

photo of John Kasich
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio Gov. John Kasich is joining the chorus of voices opposing a Trump immigration policy separating immigrant families at the United States border. Speaking on MSNBC Monday, Kasich blasted the practice.

“Think about this. Think about the fact that in our country, children, young children are being separated from their mothers and fathers. Could you imagine the terrifying effect on these kids?” he said.

photo of Gov. John Kasich
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. John Kasich says Ohio should be doing everything it can to defend the part of the Affordable Care Act that requires health-care coverage for people with pre-existing conditions. This once again positions Kasich against President Donald Trump, who has said his administration will not fight for the law.

Kasich is strongly opposed to a lawsuit filed by 20 states fighting the part of Obamacare that makes sure no one is denied health care because of pre-existing conditions.

photo of Gov. John Kasich
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

May’s 20,000 new private sector jobs in Ohio mean the state is outpacing the nation in job growth rate so far this year, though the state had no measurable job growth in all of last year. But Gov. John Kasich warns that the latest trend will be short-lived if leaders rework JobsOhio.

Expectant giraffe mother Macy
Watering Hole Safari & Watrpark website

Ohio’s newest zoo is anticipating a new arrival. Macy the giraffe at the Watering Hole Safari and Water Park built by the owner of Monsoon Lagoon in Port Clinton is adding to the herd.  

Watering Hole Safari & Water Park is a walking zoo that opened just last year.  Owner Bill Coburn says Macy is the youngest of three giraffes there and is expecting her calf in July or August.

Starting this week, a live “giraffe-cam” will follow her progress on the zoo webpage until birthing time, which Coburn says will be handled on site.

Picture of Brandon Robinson, Destiny Williams and Son
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

Akron continues to struggle with what to do with a tent city for homeless people – and with what to do with its bigger homelessness problem. Here's a closer look at the legal battle and the options.

Destiny Williams and her now 3-month-old son, James, have moved on from Second Chance Village.

“He was conceived here, actually, so he’s the first Second-Chance baby.”

photo of Kent State
KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, June 18:

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From NPR

Do you see a blue dress or a gold dress? Well, this time it's a green Zara jacket. And the color doesn't matter — it's what's written on the back in big white graffiti lettering: "I REALLY DON'T CARE, DO U?"

Months before he was asked to review a Justice Department request for a citizenship question to be added to the 2020 census, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross already had concluded that including one "could be warranted." In fact, Ross and his staff asked the Justice Department to submit the formal request for the controversial question, according to a newly released memo written

Updated at 9:42 p.m. ET

Charles Krauthammer, the prominent Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for the Washington Post and commentator for the Fox News Channel, has died.

His death was confirmed by Fred Hiatt, the editorial page editor for the Post. The cause of Krauthammer's death was cancer. He was 68.

Opportunity, phone home!

NASA scientists are still holding out hope they will hear from the surprisingly long-lived Mars rover. It went into snooze mode earlier this month, thanks to a gargantuan dust storm on the Red Planet that's blocking beams from reaching the solar panels that recharge the rover's batteries.

A Texas sheriff has barred his deputies from taking on additional work as off-duty security at a recently built tent encampment intended to house migrant children separated from their parents at the border.

El Paso Sheriff Richard Wiles said he feared the assignment to oversee minors forcibly separated from their parents would fuel the current controversy over the practice and undermine trust between law enforcement and the people they serve.

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