Poster on the wall
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Heroin Is A National Priority and Personal Tragedy, And Sometimes Those Two Stories Become One

For some, the fight against the opioid epidemic is a national priority. For others, it’s a personal struggle. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze takes us to a basement room in Massillon, where, for about an hour last week, the story of broad policy and personal battles intertwined.

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SHUTTERSTOCK

Several proposals at the Statehouse are attempting to cut down on prison time in favor of rehabilitation. Supporters say this reduces overcrowding in prisons and the likelihood of repeat offenses. Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports one group is trying to bring the voice of victims into the conversations.

MARCH FOR SCIENCE

Five hundred cities around the world are staging demonstrations this weekend to promote awareness of and investments in science. The March For Science includes 12 cities in Ohio.

WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair reports that scientists are feeling the need to speak out.

photo of Tracy Plouck
DANIEL KONIK / OGT

The most recent figures on drug overdoses in Ohio are from 2015, when more than 3,000 Ohioans died. And last year’s numbers are expected to be worse. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler talked to the head of the state’s drug-addiction agency about the state budget and what it means for the opioid epidemic.

Leedco wind farm
WKSU

Lakewood City Council is supporting the proposed Icebreaker wind farm in Lake Erie, which would be about 7  miles offshore from Lakewood.

Council passed a resolution that cites Ohio’s over-dependence on fossil fuels and a potential economic boost for the city.

photo of Escher String Quartet
SOPHIE ZHAI

The city of Akron and Tuesday Musical want to help the city relax using classical music. WKSU’s Phil de Oliveira reports on a new initiative to bring live chamber music to Akron’s public spaces.

The free, 45-minute concerts are part of a series called Decompression Chamber. The idea for the concerts came out of research suggesting classical music decreases stress and enhances brain function.

Pipeline sections
M.L. Schultze / WKSU

A week ago,  an estimated 1.5 million gallons of a fluid used in drilling the underground pathway for the Rover gas pipeline spilled in southwestern Stark County. The accident was in an area where Canton has shallow wells for its water supply.  

photo of drug protest in Columbus
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

April 20th is a day widely celebrated by those in favor of legalizing marijuana. But as Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports, hundreds of high school students from around Ohio have a different message.

A sea of high school students in purple tee shirts marched down the street to the Statehouse. Delaney McQuown, a senior at Upper Sandusky High School, says the message is simple: Don’t do drugs.

“Marijuana is definitely a gateway drug and although people say it’s not a drug, it really is and it affects your brain and body in ways you don’t understand," she says.

photo of Kathy Hanratty
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

A proposed amendment to the state budget has some people asking whether it would allow probate court judges to penalize people who “interfere with a park district’s purposes" -- including, potentially, protesters.

JOHN ALLER
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Ohio is getting $26 million from the federal government to help fight the opioid epidemic. 

The CURES Act passed in the waning days of the Obama administration and promised a billion dollars over two years to improve monitoring, prevention and treatment. This week, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced the first round of $485 million in grants to states.

The Cleveland Browns head to Philadelphia next week with the first pick in the NFL Draft. At a press conference yesterday, Browns Vice President Sashi Brown says he feels good about picking at No. 1 but would not say if the team had decided who it will select. Brown spoke positively of his meeting with Texas A&M’s Myles Garrett.

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From NPR

Chinese officials smashed a bottle of champagne on the bow of their second aircraft carrier Wednesday, launching what the Defense Ministry calls the country's first "homemade" carrier — which took less than four years to build.

The as-yet-unnamed carrier joins the Liaoning, a repurposed 1980s-era Soviet ship that was bought from Ukraine and launched in 2012. Together, the Chinese ships represent a new dimension in the increasingly crowded waters in and around Asia, where claims and counter-claims have been made on islands and shipping routes.

Appliance manufacturers and home builders are in Washington, D.C., today to celebrate a popular energy efficiency program, even as it's slated for elimination in President Trump's proposed budget.

You probably know the program's little blue label with the star — the Environmental Protection Agency says 90 percent of U.S. households do.

The festivities at this month's third annual Qingyuan marathon, in southern China's Guangdong province, begin at 7 a.m.

On one side of the starting line, there's a traditional Chinese music troupe in robes and long, flowing beards; on the other, there's a stage full of dancing girls wearing skimpy marathon attire, gyrating their hips in unison to a rap song.

Stuck in the middle are more than 23,000 runners, itching to start. The music stops, a gun is fired, and for the next half-hour, runners jostle with one another to cross the starting line

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In the cool mountains of the Upper Yangtze region, Chinese villagers clamber up dogwood and maple trees to gather what Dr. Oz has called a "miracle anti-aging pill." The small, red schisandra berry has a peculiar taste — five tastes, in fact, because it's considered to be at once sweet, sour, salty, bitter and pungent.

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