Ashland University football
Ashland University

The View From Pluto: Northeast Ohio's Big-Time, Small College Football Teams Eye National Titles

There are three Northeast Ohio college football teams competing for national titles. Ashland University is in the Division II Sweet Sixteen, while in Division III, powerhouse Mount Union hosts Case Western Reserve University this weekend. WKSU commentator Terry Pluto talks to Amanda Rabinowitz about big time, small college football. Ashland's success with Lee Owens
This past weekend, Ashland University stunned Division II two-time national champion Northwest Missouri State. Ashland is...

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ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

After months of speculation, it appears a shake-up in the Democratic race for governor next year is starting. A potential candidate who is likely to be a front runner in that contest has made a big move.

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF CLEVELAND

A new report finds that minority-owned businesses have a more difficult time getting credit from lenders than companies with white owners.

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STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

NOTE: The story about the execution of an ill death row inmate has been updated. Alva Campbell Jr.'s execution was delayed after officials could not find a suitable vein for the lethal injection.

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, November 15th:

Knight Awards dance presentation
Tim Rudell / WKSU

Arts projects in Akron are splitting  $743-thousand as part of the latest Knight Arts Challenge Awards. The winning projects were announced Tuesday night. 

Case Western Football
Case Western Reserve University

Case Western Reserve University is nationally recognized for academics. This year, it’s also excelling in athletics. The football team that’s made up of future doctors, engineers and financiers has made the Division III NCAA tournament for the first time since 2009. The team was 10-0 during the regular season.

WKSU commentator Terry Pluto says many people, including some Case students, are surprised to learn that Case has a football team.

Jo Ingles

The debate over gun control happens daily in nearly every part of the country and today, it was front and center as a gun bill was debated at the Statehouse. But can common ground be found? 

ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A state senator wants to toss out the idea of expulsions for kids who are in third grade or younger. The lawmaker says this can go a long way to closing the achievement gap for disadvantaged students.

Republican Sen. Peggy Lehner is proposing the ban on expulsions and out-of-school suspensions.

 Lehner says there’s a clear link between suspensions and drop in academic achievement among students who are minorities, disabled or from low-income families.

photo of Steve Mnuchin
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Treasury Secretary came to Columbus to promote Republican lawmakers’ $1.5 trillion tax reform plan, which they say will grow the economy, make the tax code simpler and create a middle-class tax cut. Not everyone agrees.

Protestors were waiting for Steve Mnuchin, led by Ohio Democratic Party Chair David Pepper, who said Ohio has trailed the national recovery for 57 months and suffered with stagnant wages for decades.

Picture of downtown Cleveland
WKSU

A new study finds significant disparities between the rich and poor in Cuyahoga County.

The Center for Community Solutions, a non-profit, non-partisan think tank, looked at data on demographics, education, housing, poverty, health and employment in Cuyahoga County Council’s 11 districts.

photo of Senator Rob Portman
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s Republican U.S. Senator, Rob Portman, says he supports making changes to the Affordable Care Act through the tax bill in the works in Congress. 

A proposal in the Senate would end the individual mandate, which levies a tax on people who don’t have health insurance. 

In a conference call with reporters Tuesday, Portman said he’s not a fan. 

“I’m okay with repealing it, I’ve supported that in the past. Frankly, I would have preferred to repeal it as part of a broader healthcare reform bill.”

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From NPR

Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri will be remaining in power, at least for now — despite the strange address he gave more than two weeks ago, while he was in Saudi Arabia, stating that he planned to resign.

The about-face comes shortly after Hariri returned to Beirut from that trip. The unusual events of his time in Riyadh prompted suspicions that Saudi Arabia was exerting unusual amounts of pressure Hariri. And the rapid reversal is only more fuel for speculation that Hariri was coerced, or even held as a hostage, by Saudi Arabia.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Updated at 8 a.m. ET

After a 5 1/2-year trial, the former Bosnian Serb military commander blamed for orchestrating the murders of thousands of ethnic Muslims has learned his own fate.

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