Ashland University football
Ashland University

The View From Pluto: Northeast Ohio's Big-Time, Small College Football Teams Eye National Titles

There are three Northeast Ohio college football teams competing for national titles. Ashland University is in the Division II Sweet Sixteen, while in Division III, powerhouse Mount Union hosts Case Western Reserve University this weekend. WKSU commentator Terry Pluto talks to Amanda Rabinowitz about big time, small college football. Ashland's success with Lee Owens
This past weekend, Ashland University stunned Division II two-time national champion Northwest Missouri State. Ashland is...

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WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

The White House is sending Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin to Columbus, where he’ll make a case for the GOP tax plan.  

Steve Mnuchin will speak at the Ohio Council of Retail Merchants' annual luncheon at the Athletic Club of Columbus.

Mnuchin will discuss the tax reform bill's impact on the country's economy. National Retail Federation President Matthew Shay will moderate the conversation.

photo of Gov John Kasich at OSBA meeting
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The relationship between Gov. John Kasich and Ohio’s education leaders has been troubled for years. When it comes to school administrators, they’ve seen proposals from Kasich that cut funding and change the structure of school boards. These decisions loomed over Kasich as he addressed a statewide school boards association conference for the first time in his seven years in office.

photo of Franz Welser-Most and the Cleveland Orchestra
ROGER MASTROIANNI / THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA

A record 257 arts and cultural organizations in Cuyahoga County will share nearly $12-million-worth of funding from a cigarette tax this coming year.  Who gets what was announced in a public meeting last night.  But not everybody is celebrating. Those tax revenues are on a steady downward trend.

The Cleveland Orchestra is getting about a 26 percent cut in funding due to dwindling cigarette sales.  Speaking for the Musical Arts Association which governs the Orchestra, David Hooker said the cut took his organization by surprise.

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TIM EVANSON / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, November 14th:

JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU / OHIO HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

The opponents of Issue 2, the Drug Price Relief Act, recently outspent backers of that proposal by a four-to-one margin. And most of the money in the opposition’s campaign war chest couldn’t be directly traced because it was in an LLC rather than a traditional political action committee.

NICK CASTELE / IDEASTREAM

Kevin Kelley will stay on as president of Cleveland City Council. Kelley drew no opponents at a Monday meeting of council’s Democratic caucus.
 

Kelley has served as council president since 2013.

photo of Otis Moss Jr. Health Center
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS

University Hospitals in Cleveland is hoping to help residents in the Fairfax neighborhood with a new kind of prescription:  healthy food. The system will open a food pharmacy there next year.

Residents of Fairfax, which county officials declared a food desert, disproportionally suffer from health issues like hypertension, strokes and obesity.

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DIMITRIS KALOGEROPOYLOS / FLICKR

A new report in the Journal of the American Medical Association gauges the effectiveness of opioids for pain relief, and WKSU’s Kabir Bhatia reports on what researchers found out about the highly addictive medications.

photo of empty commercial property
SUMMIT COUNTY LAND BANK

The Summit County Land Bank has launched a new program that it hopes will keep commercial properties from sliding toward blight and into demolition.

The land bank's Building for Business program is aimed at people who want to re-purpose old buildings for mixed-use or even into residences.

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From NPR

Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri will be remaining in power, at least for now — despite the strange address he gave more than two weeks ago, while he was in Saudi Arabia, stating that he planned to resign.

The about-face comes shortly after Hariri returned to Beirut from that trip. The unusual events of his time in Riyadh prompted suspicions that Saudi Arabia was exerting unusual amounts of pressure Hariri. And the rapid reversal is only more fuel for speculation that Hariri was coerced, or even held as a hostage, by Saudi Arabia.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Updated at 8 a.m. ET

After a 5 1/2-year trial, the former Bosnian Serb military commander blamed for orchestrating the murders of thousands of ethnic Muslims has learned his own fate.

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