News

photo of fantasy sports user
SHUTTERSTOCK

A measure that would revise rules on fantasy sports, which haven’t been touched in decades, is on its way to the Ohio Senate after passing the House.

Under the proposal, players would have to be 18 or older and the companies running fantasy sports competitions would have to be licensed by the state.

House leaders are quick to note that fantasy sports as we know it today is entirely different than the paper-and-pencil version from the 90's.

Canton near the interchange of Market  and Tuscarawas
Tim Rudell / WKSU

One part of downtown Canton is now going to hold two economic development district designations.  The first involves a bit of history, while the other is all high tech.

A state law passed in August lets cities create Downtown Redevelopment Districts where they can offer tax incentives for developing new or rehabbing existing properties.

To qualify, an area needs to have at least one historic building in need of renovation. Canton has more than one.  And it has something much newer that is making another kind of district designation possible.

photo of Third Frontier Commission panel
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

In his State of the State speech last month, Gov. John Kasich announced he wants the state’s Third Frontier Commission to spend $20 million toward high-tech solutions to the deadly opioid crisis.

The panel has taken the first step toward doing that.

Historic Mill Creek Park
Tim Rudell / WKSU

Local parks in Ohio could be forced into oil and gas “drilling units” if the state Senate adopts the budget bill as passed by the House. Managers and supporters of many local parks, including in northeast Ohio, are joining efforts to keep that from happening.

An amendment to H.B. 49 — the state operating budget — says if 65 percent of property owners around a proposed oil and  gas “drilling unit” agree to be part of it, the other 35 percent can be forced to join. That can include public entities like park districts -- although state parks are exempted.

photo of Cleveland Police Headquarters
TIM EVANSON / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

The ACLU of Ohio is asking Cleveland to recommit to the promises made in a  2015 consent decree to reform the Police Department. This Friday marks two years since the agreement was signed.

Last month, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions ordered the review of every police reform agreement in the country.

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