Shawn Rohlin

A Kent State University economics professor is part of a federally funded study of police bias. Associate Professor Shawn Rohlin says the $280,000 Department of Justice grant looks build upon his earlier research on bias in younger officers.

Rohlin, and another economics professor from Syracuse University, have been studying the Syracuse City Police Department. He says they’ve found some encouraging news.

photo of help wanted sign

Ohio’s jobless rate ticked up slightly last month. 

The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services reports September’s jobless rate was 4.8 percent, up a 0.1 percent from August.  

Government, construction, hospitality, manufacturing and the health-care industries lost more than 3,000 jobs, but around the same number were added in the finance sector.

But even with the uptick, Ohio’s jobless rate remains below the nation’s unemployment rate of 5 percent, and a full point above its all-time low from April 2001.

Trump and Pence

It was another weekend of presidential campaigning in Northeast Ohio. Donald Trump attracted thousands of people to the I-X Center in Brook Park, 24-hours after Hillary Clinton appeared before about 1,500 at Cuyahoga Community College.

Surrogates for Hillary Clinton staged an event before Trump's appearance; just as Trump supporters lined up outside Clinton's speech.

E.J. Dionne at Akron Roundtable
Tim Rudell / WKSU

Washington Post columnist and NPR commentator E.J. Dionne is predict a victory for Hillary Clinton on Election Day, but getting no joy from the race leading up to it.   

“I value every day that I am on this earth.But there are 19 days left until this election, and I cannot wait  until they are over.  I have enjoyed this election less than any election in my entire life -- because I think there is bitterness to it and a lack of connection to problem solving.”

Hillary Clinton Stumps at Tri-C in Cleveland

Oct 22, 2016
Clinton in Cleveland

In a speech that tried to reach out to voters of all parties -- and no party -- Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton largely addressed issues that appealed to her liberal base – increasing the minimum wage, college affordability and clean energy.

But it was her criticism of her opponent that appealed most to the crowd at Cuyahoga Community College Friday night.  

Clinton was jovial as she asked the audience if anyone had watched the presidential debate Wednesday night – teeing up her punch line.