News

photo of pills
JO INGLES / OPR

The Ohio Supreme Court says backers of a plan to cap the price Ohio pays for drugs it buys for Medicaid, prisons and other state-run programs fell short of the signatures they need to put it before voters next year. 

The court rejected more than 10,000 signatures turned in by Ohioans for Fair Drug Prices, leaving the group more than 5,000 signatures short.

Spokesman Ged Kenslea says the group has until Aug.25 to come up with more signatures to continue its campaign to take the proposal to lawmakers and eventually voters.

photo of Ted Strickland
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate is calling for a halt to the creation of private, for-profit charter schools. 

Former Democratic  Gov. Ted Strickland held a campaign event with the state’s two large teachers’ unions, saying he is tired of high-stakes testing and bureaucratic regulations of public school teachers. Afterward, he told reporters he also wants a moratorium on for profit charter schools.

photo of Marijuana
OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

An Ohio based lawn care company that makes products to kill weeds has made an unusual purchase.

Marysville based Scotts Miracle Gro makes products to kill weeds. But recently, a subsidiary of Scotts purchased a Dutch company that makes products which are commonly used to grow marijuana.

Earlier this month, it spent $136 million for a company that makes hydroponic products, including grow lights, which are often used to raise vegetables and plants, including marijuana, indoors.

photo of James Slowiak
THE UNIVERSITY OF AKRON

The University of Akron has approved plans to bring back the school’s theater arts degree.

The program was suspended two years ago due to low enrollment.

James Slowiak, a theater professor at the university, helped create the plans for the new program.

He says while theater classes are still offered, bringing the full degree back is important to build the theater program as a whole.

Cleveland Hopkins Airport
KEVIN NIEDERMIER / WKSU

Planes flying in and out of Cleveland Hopkins International Airport will soon get more directions from satellites than ground-based radar systems.  The Federal Aviation Administration says the new system will allow straighter flight paths, which will save fuel and reduce flight times.

As WKSU’s Kevin Niedermier reports, it’s part of a modernization effort that is already operating in Washington D.C., Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston.

Pages