News

Senate President Keith Faber
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Senate has rejected a major appointment by Gov. John Kasich. As statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, this could be a sign of friction among Ohio’s top Republicans.

Months of tension between the Senate and Gov. Kasich over his nomination of Columbus lawyer Howard Petricoff to the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio culminated this week when a committee voted to reject Petricoff.

The Senate is called to advise and consent on gubernatorial nominations. Usually these committee votes are just a formality.

photo of Shadia Jallaq
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Center for American Women in Politics at Rutgers shows women, who make up more than half of the U.S. population, hold only about 20 percent of the seats in Congress and the U.S. Senate, and only slightly more than that in state legislatures. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles took a look at a program designed to encourage women to take the first step toward running for office.

Donald Trump victory in Cincinnati
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

President-elect Donald Trump was in Cincinnati last night at the first stop of what's billed as a thank you tour.

He drew heavily from his campaign, promising to drain the swamp of influence and power in Washington, to destroy ISIS in the Middle East, and to build a wall to stop illegal immigration. But he also promised to unite the nation.

photo of FERC
MARK URYCKI / IDEASTREAM

The NEXUS gas pipeline is not a done deal, but a federal environmental impact statement issued on Wednesday helps clear the way for the project’s construction.

The NEXUS gas pipeline could have some negative environmental effects, but mitigation measures could reduce the impact to “less than significant levels.” That’s according to the final environmental impact statement issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. 

The proposed natural gas pipeline stretches across more than 255 miles from eastern Ohio through Stark, Medina and Lorain counties and into Michigan.

Dan Horrigan and Clarence Tucker
Tim Rudell / WKSU

Akron has a new fire chief, the 19th in the 180-year history of the fire department.  It was a hire from within that Mayor Dan Horrigan says will help maintain continuity, stability and a commitment to community for one of the city’s most important services. 

In 1988, Clarence Tucker walked into Akron Fire Station No. 7 for his first day as a firefighter medic.  This week he walked into the same station to become chief of Akron’s 350 person Fire Department.

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