News
News Home
Quick Bites
Exploradio
News Archive
News Channel
Special Features
NPR
nowplaying
On AirNewsClassical
Loading...
  
School Closings
WKSU Support
Funding for WKSU is made possible in part through support from the following businesses and organizations.

Hennes Paynter Communications

Metro RTA

Hospice of the Western Reserve


For more information on how your company or organization can support WKSU, download the WKSU Media Kit.

(WKSU Media Kit PDF icon )


Donate Your Vehicle to WKSU

Programs Schedule Make A Pledge Member BenefitsFAQ/HelpContact Us
Ohio


Higher ed presidents meet with Kasich, agree on reforms
Kasich, along with university and college presidents, seek to improve the state's public education system. 
by WKSU's STATEHOUSE BUREAU CHIEF KAREN KASLER


Reporter
Karen Kasler
 
Download (WKSU Only)
In The Region:

There was quite a meeting of the minds in Gov. John Kasich’s office, as the presidents of many of Ohio’s public universities and community colleges gathered to put forward their ideas on improving Ohio’s public education system. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports on their reform plan.

Hear Kasler on higher ed reform meeting

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (3:19)


Bridge: higher ed reform meeting

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (1:00)


Thirty-one presidents representing Ohio’s 14 public universities, 24 regional campuses and 23 community colleges sat in the Statehouse Cabinet room, facing Gov. John Kasich. The governor was flanked by Chancellor Jim Petro, who oversees Ohio’s higher education system, and Gordon Gee, who as Ohio State University’s president is clearly the education leader everyone listens to – as evident by the fact that the meeting was held up by a few minutes till Gee arrived. 

“Hi, Gordon. How are you?” 
“Always late.” (laughter)

While the gathering of the heads of the state’s higher ed leadership was unique, the reforms they brought forward have been talked about before – such as institutions working together to make a single capital improvements list of individual lists. But the governor says there’s a new focus on results and incentives. 

“The greatest motivation for me when I was getting educated as a kid K-12 was that my parents would not let me play baseball if I didn’t make the honor roll. Ok? I didn’t understand till later that if I didn’t get certain things, I couldn’t be certain things, and then I started getting more motivated.

That’s where I want us to go and I hope – and we’re going to work together.”

Under the plan, as presented by Gee on behalf of the group, half of all state funding for state colleges and universities would be tied to the schools’ ability to graduate students, not just to enroll them. 

“It’s about completion. It’s not about rewarding people for being warm bodies. It’s about rewarding people for completing what they’ve done and for us then making a bright future for them.”

For four year institutions, that’s a big increase over the funding now tied to graduation, which is right now about 20%. But Gee says there won’t be a temptation to pad the data to get more money. 

“One issue that I can assure you that we will make sure that we do not have is a process whereby people are rewarded for ‘body completion’ – they’re rewarded for ‘quality completion’, and that will be part of the incentive process, so we have already talked about that.”

And the plan also would reward universities for attracting top students and then keeping them in Ohio after graduation. It seeks to repeal rules on regional campuses that main campuses don’t have, and to eliminate the separate formula for funding main campuses versus regional ones. For community colleges, there would be rewards for training non-traditional and at-risk students and for students who successfully complete associates’ degrees.  But for many parents and students, the question is not about state money, but about the money they have to shell out for tuition and other college costs. Ohio University president Roderick McDavis says these incentives will force the institutions to help kids focus and get out more quickly. 

“If you complete a college degree in less than four years, you’re saving money. What now we begin to do is put more advisors in place, to put more counselors in place, to put more people in place who can carve out a pathway to help students understand you can reach your goals sooner.”

While there’s a lot of talk of rewards, there aren’t many specifics in these recommendations on what the rewards will be and how success will be measured. But Gee says this is a journey, and is just the first of ten rounds.

(Click image for larger view.)

Add Your Comment
Name:

Location:

E-mail: (not published, only used to contact you about your comment)


Comments:




 
Page Options

Print this page

E-Mail this page / Send mp3

Share on Facebook




Stories with Recent Comments

The first big private gift comes in for the pro football HOF project
The HOF has needed a shot in the arm for many years and this project will go a long way to getting the attraction the attention it deserves (next: upgrad...

Environmental study nears completion in East Liverpool
Twenty years ago my twin sister and I protested the building and operation of the WTI facility citing several studies that indicated the risk of cancer due to ...

HOF's Canton expansion could take an island and make it a village
I live in the block from Broad St to the Hall of Fame and will be impacted by the expansion. I am in the process of selling my home and planned to long before i...

Cleveland redeploys police to replace rejected red-light traffic cameras
Periodic rotational enforcement without warning does NOT change behavior and the city officials know that. This is the basis of all officer-run enforcement trap...

New enrollment period offers more insurance options
The removal of federal funding for healthcare CO-OPs may limit the growth of the CO-OP movement. http://www.healthcaretownhall.com/?p=6381

The family of Boardman vet killed in Vietnam receives his medals
My name is Mike Eisenbraun. I am Larry's brother. I was 14 years old when Larry was killed in Vietnam. He has been gone for 46 years but it seems like yester...

Cleveland seniors are creating new wealth -- and facing new challenges
Why is anyone surprised that we people over 65 are not retiring? If you have been paying attention, defined company funded pensions were phasing out in the eigh...

Ohio company cuts off a dairy supplier after allegations of animal abuse
these people should be held accountable for their actions. i would be more than pleased to see a year or more behind bars. i will NEVER eat anything that comes ...

Goodyear recruits thousands of vets
What a wonderful interview! Excellent reporting skills by a talented young reporter! I look forward to hearing more from Ms. Schley!

Copyright © 2014 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

 
In Partnership With:

NPR PRI Kent State University

listen in windows media format listen in realplayer format Car Talk Hosts: Tom & Ray Magliozzi Fresh Air Host: Terry Gross A Service of Kent State University 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. NPR Senior Correspondent: Noah Adams Living on Earth Host: Steve Curwood 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. A Service of Kent State University