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Noon news headlines for Jan.16, 2012
Judge orders state to provide autism treatment; North Canton schools step-up security; Kasich signs bank tax reduction bill
by WKSU's JEFF ST. CLAIR


Reporter / Host
Jeff St. Clair
 
  • Judge orders state to provide autism treatment
  • North Canton schools step-up security
  • Kasich signs bank tax reduction bill
  • Farmers urged to help reduce runoff
  • Cleveland man sentenced for false tip in murder case
  • Judge orders state to provide autism treatment
    A federal judge says Ohio must provide or pay for intensive treatment for an autistic 2-year-old whose parents sued the state saying he was denied federally mandated treatment.

    Robert and Holly Young filed a lawsuit in Cincinnati last month accusing the state of discriminating against children with autism because the state failed to provide a treatment called applied behavioral analysis.  The judge yesterday ordered the state to provide or pay for the $2,700 dollars per week treatment as the case proceeds.

    State officials would not comment on the ruling or whether they will appeal the judge’s order.  But the Ohio Department of Health has said the therapy is not required under federal law.


    North Canton schools step-up security
    A northeast Ohio school district is stepping up security in the wake of recent school shootings.  North Canton schools is considering buying special radios that employees could use to communicate if an armed intruder attacked.  The idea is that staff could use the digital, CB-style radios to alert others in the building if a shooter attacked.

    The radios are one of several security considerations outlined Tuesday night during a meeting with parents, including installing security entrances with bullet-resistant glass at three North Canton elementary schools.  

    Districts elsewhere around the state have been reviewing their security measures. The Orrville School Board agreed to allow a high school science teacher to carry a concealed weapon to class.


    Kasich signs bank tax reduction bill
    Gov. John Kasich is highlighting a new tax structure for financial institutions today which allows the vast majority of Ohio banks to pay less in taxes.  Kasich plans a ceremonial bill-signing this afternoon at a bank in Newark.

    By removing some tax loopholes for larger institutions, proponents say the law makes it easier for them to file taxes and provides more money for loans.  Some Democrats called it an unnecessary tax cut for banks.  The bill goes into effect March 27.

    Farmers urged to help reduce runoff
    Groups hoping to avoid stricter pollution regulations are encouraging farmers to voluntarily reduce nutrient runoff that's been partly blamed for algae hurting water quality in several lakes.  The Ohio Farm Bureau is among 20 groups that sent letters urging thousands of farmers to take proactive steps, warning the government might create new regulations if they don't.

    A Farm bureau spokesman says officials aren't sure of the best solution but suggest farmers take steps now to address farm runoff. That includes not using more fertilizer than needed.  Phosphorus from farm fertilizers and livestock manure feeds algae blooms that have been a problem in Lake Erie and inland lakes.


    Cleveland man sentenced for false tip in murder case
    A prison inmate has been sentenced to 4½ years after admitting he provided a false tip in the 2003 disappearance of a 16-year-old Ohio girl.  A judge in Cleveland sentenced 26-year-old Robert Wolford on Tuesday on his guilty plea to obstruction of justice, making a false report and making a false alarm.  Last summer, he tipped authorities to look for the remains of Amanda Berry of Cleveland in a city lot.  It was dug up with backhoes, but no remains were found.  Wolford is currently serving a 26-year sentence for a 2007 slaying.

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