News
News Home
Quick Bites
Exploradio
News Archive
News Channel
Special Features
NPR
nowplaying
On AirNewsClassical
Loading...
  
School Closings
WKSU Support
Funding for WKSU is made possible in part through support from the following businesses and organizations.

Metro RTA

Lehmans

Knight Foundation


For more information on how your company or organization can support WKSU, download the WKSU Media Kit.

(WKSU Media Kit PDF icon )


Donate Your Vehicle to WKSU

Programs Schedule Make A Pledge Member BenefitsFAQ/HelpContact Us
Arts and Entertainment


Peninsula celebrates the Cuyahoga River with a challenge to capture its beauty and recall its worst disaster
Fifth Annual Plein Air Competition for artwork created outdoors will commemorate the Great Flood of 1913
by WKSU's VIVIAN GOODMAN


Reporter
Vivian Goodman
 
Kathy Harrington says she looks for scenes to paint where there's a lot of contrast between light and dark and some movement.
Courtesy of Edward Duvall
Download (WKSU Only)
In The Region:

Fine art will play a prominent part in the annual celebration of our crooked river.  River Day will bring the traditional clean-ups, cookouts and concerts.  But that’s just the start of a steady flow of riverside events, including a painting contest along the banks of the Cuyahoga.

Click to listen

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (4:54)


Peninsula’s Plein Air Competition: Along the Crooked River: 100 years later 

In 1913, a massive flood engulfed the Cuyahoga Valley, destroying the Ohio and Erie Canal. This year’s plein air competition commemorates the flood. 

Who: The plein-air style competition is open to artists 18 and older. Each artist can submit no more than two pieces for judging. Employees of the National Park and members of the Peninsula Chamber are  not eligible for awards.

Fees: $35 registration fee

When: Applications through June 9th. Competition June 7-9, with works created during the competition for sale at Peninsula Art Academy June 29-August 10. Winning works will be featured on http://www.explorepeninsula.com

More information: http://www.explorepeninsula.com or call 330-657-2788.

Saturday marks the 23rd annual River Day. 

But it’s been 100 years since the darkest day in the river’s history, the Great Flood of 1913. It engulfed the river valley, swamped the Ohio and Erie Canal and claimed more than 600 lives.

And it’s that tragedy artists will commemorate next month as they paint at selected sites in the village of Peninsula, in the open air.

En plein air is what the French call it.

It’s a portable, impromptu painting style that began in the 1870s when someone figured out how to make oil paint squirt out of tubes.

Beauty inspired by an unprecedented disaster
Cuyahoga Valley National Park Ranger Karen Kopchak helps give the annual painting contest historical context. And this year it’s all about the flood. 

“The end of March, for about five days, the Flood of 1913 actually turns out to be the biggest, the most widespread national disaster ever in recorded history. It impacted 15 states.”

Locations designated for the competition are in areas that were most heavily affected by the flood.

Cuyahoga Valley National Park teams up with Peninsula’s Chamber of Commerce to sponsor the annual contest. Debra Bures is co-owner of Elements Gallery, vice president of the chamber and chairwoman of Peninsula’s plein-air contest.

“This is an area of great innovators, of free thinkers, free-spirited individuals. We have many artists who are residents who have studios in the valley. So it was the natural thing for us to do.  And with the river here, the river is such an important part of the culture here.”  

A tight window
Painters compete for prizes, including $350 for Best of Show.

The catch is, it all has to be done during the second weekend in June.  Beginning Thursday evening ,June 6th, competitors must  bring a blank canvas to Elements Gallery for an official stamp. Not until then can they start painting on the canvas, and they must deliver the finished art work  by 5 p.m. Sunday, June 9th.

Later this summer the paintings will be on view  at Peninsula Art Academy.

Nicki Lanzi has entered the plein-air contest every year since 2009 because she loves the challenge of working in the open air, even in a swift wind.

“I’ve had some easels fly away, but I got them back so that’s OK.”

Even with bugs, rain and critics -- it's still fun
Kathy Harrington of Hudson took up painting en plein air after her husband died 17 years ago, and although she’s been drenched in sudden downpours and had bugs land on her paintings, she's never stopped.

Passersby often stop to chat.

“And you could be painting five acres and someone will say, ‘You left that branch out.'" But she welcomes the interaction, saying it's among the many rewards  of painting outdoors.

On a day like today all of your senses are involved. I can hear the river. I can hear the birds. I can smell the river and the beautiful flowers when they bloom. I can hear the crunch of people’s feet, and I feel that I’m more into the painting. And then years later when I look at the painting, I can recall that whole day in its entirety.”  

 


(Click image for larger view.)

Add Your Comment
Name:

Location:

E-mail: (not published, only used to contact you about your comment)


Comments:




 
Page Options

Print this page

E-Mail this page / Send mp3

Share on Facebook




Stories with Recent Comments

Terry Pluto: U of A's new athletic director has the toughest job in town
It is a hard sell. The Students do not want to go to the football games and they do not want to pay for the program. They have a lot of student loan debt and t...

Akron considering the future of the B.F. Goodrich smokestacks
This BFGoodrich alumna says, "Thank you, Dave Lieberth!"

State creates panel to look at Ohio charter school sponsors
It is more than disturbing that charter schools, which seemed like a good idea years ago, have begun to cripple public school education.

DEVO mural in Akron is now on display downtown
The installation is not at the former site of Chili Dog Mac. CDM was one block north on the other side of Main St.

New report shows growth in white collar jobs for Northeast Ohio
Unfortunately, there are fewer jobs in comparison to the number of professionals applying for them. I have been had a full time job since June 2012. In order to...

Advocacy group: Ohio could lead in clean energy
Ohio Legislators, You are supposed to be our leaders but you're not taking us where we want to go - where we need to go!

Campaign for and against marijuana legalization begins
Cannabis legalization needs to happen as soon as possible! But not if it gives monopolies to a selected few to grow and sell the herb. Responsible Ohio's mono...

Heinen's in downtown Cleveland sponsors a contest for food entrepreneurs
Love that this took place right here! What a way to support local. Thank you Heinens! Love this quote, as a small local biz, I agree, it's big!! "To be a small...

Pluto: How the Indians' blockbuster deal went bust
Terry, As a long time reader of yours I am generally on the same page - and we're also about the same age. Anyway, like many, I am dismayed at the greedy and en...

Copyright © 2015 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

 
In Partnership With:

NPR PRI Kent State University

listen in windows media format listen in realplayer format Car Talk Hosts: Tom & Ray Magliozzi Fresh Air Host: Terry Gross A Service of Kent State University 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. NPR Senior Correspondent: Noah Adams Living on Earth Host: Steve Curwood 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. A Service of Kent State University