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Ohio


Two dozen more 'red light' cameras coming to Cleveland
Other morning news headlines: Major shale gas driller gets new CEO; Controversial in-state tuition voting bill fails
by WKSU's AMANDA RABINOWITZ


Morning Edition Host
Amanda Rabinowitz
 
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  • Major shale gas driller gets new CEO, likely to shift focus
  • Controversial in-state tuition voting bill fails
  • Tea Party activists to protest in Cincinnati 
  • Second deadly fall this year in Hocking Hills
  • Proposal would make more government meetings public
  • Cincinnati marathon runner with gun indicted
  • Two dozen more 'red light' cameras coming to Cleveland
    You’ll soon be running a greater risk of getting a traffic ticket in Cleveland. Cleveland City Council on Monday approved a four-year contract to add so-called red light cameras to 26 more intersections. Most of the cameras will be placed on the city’s East Side. Drivers will have a 30-day warning period after the equipment is installed. Cleveland currently has several dozen cameras installed, that resulted in $6 million in fines collected last year. Councilman Zack Reed was among three members who voted against the measure, saying that the city appears to be more interested in making money than in residents’ safety. The state legislature has been holding hearings on legislation to ban the controversial cameras. More than a dozen Ohio cities use traffic-enforcement cameras. Read more from The Plain Dealer 

    The new camera locations include:
    Woodland Avenue at East 55th Street
    Harvard Avenue at Lee Road
    Orange Avenue at East 30th Street
    Chester Avenue at East 105th Street
    St. Clair Avenue at East 152nd Street
    Kinsman Road at East 93rd Street
    Lee Road at Miles Road
    Stokes Boulevard at Cedar Avenue
    West 25th Street at Clark Avenue
    West 65th Street at Clark Avenue
    I-490 at East 55th Street
    Pearl Road at Denison Avenue
    Broadview Road at Brookpark Road
    St. Clair Avenue at East 105th Street
    Woodland Avenue at East 30th Street
    Lorain Avenue at West 65th Street
    Broadview Road at Spring Road
    St. Clair Avenue at East 55th Street
    Puritas Avenue at West 150th Street
    Martin Luther King Jr. Drive at East 105th Street
    Lakeview Road and Superior Avenue
    East 105th Street and Superior Avenue
    East 124th Street and Superior Avenue 
    East 156th Street and Waterloo Road
    Neff Road at East 185th Street
    East 55th Street at Broadway

    Source: The Plain Dealer

    Major shale gas driller gets new CEO, likely to shift focus
    The highest-profile company in Ohio's shale gas boom has chosen its new CEO. Chesapeake Energy Corporation says Robert Douglas Lawler will take over next month. He was an executive at Anadarko Petroleum Corporation. The New York Times reports that under 46-year-old Lawler, Chesapeake is expected to follow a more conventional route, tighten controls on spending and continue its recent path toward more oil drilling and less gas drilling. Former CEO and co-founder Aubrey McClendon resigned earlier this year after coming under scrutiny for mixing private and company interests in several oil wells. The company has more than $13 billion in debt. Through March 31, Chesapeake had drilled 249 wells in the liquid-rich Utica shale that is mostly in eastern Ohio. A total of 66 wells are in production, 86 wells are awaiting pipelines and 97 wells are in various stages of completion..

    Controversial in-state tuition voting bill fails
    A measure passed by the Ohio House that would have cost Ohio universities millions of dollars in lost tuition has failed in the Senate. The House budget amendment requires universities to charge in-state tuition rates for out-of-state students who use university identification to vote in Ohio. College officials estimate the measure would have cost $370 million in lost revenue. The Columbus Dispatch reports Senate leaders will not include the amendment in their version of the state budget, but say it could become part of a separate election reform bill. Democrats condemn the measure as an attempt to suppress the student vote in Ohio.

    Tea Party activists to protest in Cincinnati
    Tea party activists want to show their unhappiness over extra IRS scrutiny with protest rallies. Members of the Cincinnati tea party will gather at noon today and march to the federal building to continue the rally. The building houses IRS offices that handled group applications for tax-exempt status. IRS officials have acknowledged that some conservative groups received inappropriate attention and questioning. Other tea party groups also want activists in other cities to protest today at their local IRS offices.

    Second deadly fall this year in Hocking Hills
    Officials say the second deadly fall this year in the Hocking Hills region of southeastern Ohio occurred near a waterfall. An Ohio Department of Natural Resources spokesman said the latest fatal fall occurred Monday afternoon. A Dayton-area man died Saturday afternoon when he fell about 130 feet from the top of a cliff while rappelling in Hocking Hills State Forest. Last month, a young man fell from a cliff at the state park and died.

    Proposal would make more government meetings public
    A proposal in the Ohio Senate prompting concern from some public officials would make more meetings among government officials public and provide more details on government talks behind closed doors. The proposal would expand the types of discussions subject to the law and require more information stated publicly in motions to hold closed-door sessions under Ohio's Open Meetings Act. It also would expand fees and expenses that may be recovered for violations of the act. An official with the County Commissioners' Association of Ohio says some county officials worry about what would constitute public meetings.

    Cincinnati marathon runner with gun indicted
    A prosecutor says a Cincinnati Marathon participant accused of carrying a loaded gun and commenting about terrorism during the race events has been charged with menacing by stalking and weapons counts. Forty-nine-year-old David Moore of suburban Cincinnati was indicted Monday. Police say Moore opened his coat to reveal a loaded 9 mm gun when asked if he was armed.
    Listener Comments:

    Love how all the "bottom feeders" come out to complain about law enforcement devices. If you're not speeding or breaking the law then what do you have to worry about? If you're complaining then you're already proved yourself guilt. Where should they send the ticket?


    Posted by: Eric Shultz (Cleveland) on May 23, 2013 8:05AM
    Traffic cameras are just another form of Policing for Profit as Capitalism distorts our Justice System. These companies are bottom-feeders and take a 40% cut of the tickets while creating MORE dangerous intersections by fixing the lengths of yellow lights to entrap drivers. You can read about how private companies and crooked politicians have turned our Police forces on their ear in every attempt to squeeze money out of the general public at http://dregstudiosart.blogspot.com/2012/08/the-privatized-police-state.html


    Posted by: Brandt Hardin (United States) on May 21, 2013 9:05AM
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