News
News Home
Quick Bites
Exploradio
News Archive
News Channel
Special Features
NPR
nowplaying
On AirNewsClassical
Loading...
  
School Closings
WKSU Support
Funding for WKSU is made possible in part through support from the following businesses and organizations.

The Holden Arboretum

Lehmans

Don Drumm Studios


For more information on how your company or organization can support WKSU, download the WKSU Media Kit.

(WKSU Media Kit PDF icon )


Donate Your Vehicle to WKSU

Programs Schedule Make A Pledge Member BenefitsFAQ/HelpContact Us
Education


Common Core opponents gather at Ohio Statehouse
While opposition hangs on, change in Ohio policy is unlikely
Story by BILL RICE


 
Ohioans gather at the Statehouse atrium for an anti-Common Core rally.
Courtesy of Bill Rice
Download (WKSU Only)
In The Region:

Common Core opponents won recent victories in three states. Oklahoma, South Carolina and Indiana all withdrew from participation this year in the new education standards for math and English. Other states have slowed implementation. The moves reflect growing resistance, particularly in “red” states, to the Common Core. StateImpact Ohio's Bill Rice reports that, in Ohio, the Common Core remains fairly secure. But the campaign against it is as passionate as ever.

LISTEN: RICE ON COMMON CORE

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (2:51)


Brad McQueen, a fifth-grade public school teacher from Tucson, Ariz., has made a personal crusade of denouncing the Common Core. McQueen was a featured speaker at an anti-Common Core rally at the Ohio Statehouse last week. The new standards are meant to raise the bar of student achievement to better prepare kids for the global economy, but McQueen views them as nothing less than a travesty, and says those pushing the Common Core are misguided.

“They like to compare our kids and say they don’t measure up on standardized tests given around the world,” McQueen says. “'Finland outperforms us,' they say. 'China outperforms us.' 'Singapore outperforms us.' I say: 'Let them be the championship test takers.  Let ‘em! Our kids are too busy changing the world!'”

With that, the crowd of about 200 breaks into applause.

Maintaining Local Control
Heidi Huber is thrilled with the speech, and optimistic that the Common Core will eventually be turned out in Ohio. Huber heads the statewide group Ohioans Against Common Core, and organized this rally in the Statehouse atrium.  Among her top complaints against the Common Core is that it takes take away local control of education standards. 

“It goes against everything we are,” she says.  “You can’t have local control assessed by a national standard. Those two things are incompatible.”

Such sentiments have fueled the anti-Common Core movement all over the country. 

Common Core opponents won recent victories in three states. Oklahoma, South Carolina and Indiana all withdrew from participation this year in the new education standards for math and English. Other states have slowed implementation. The moves reflect growing resistance, particularly in “red” states, to the Common Core.

But they do not seem to be catching fire in Ohio, at least not with Republican Gov. John Kasich or key lawmakers. A bill introduced last year that would void the state’s adoption of the Common Core has been stalled in the House. Education Committee Chairman Gerald Stebelton, also a Republican, repeated last week his stance that the bill is dead in the water.

“As long as I’m the chairman of the House Education Committee, we’re going to have Common Core,” he told Ohio Public Radio.

Standing with the core
Over in the Senate Education Committee, Chairwoman Peggy Lehner likewise is committed to the Common Core.

“You know, I have a copy of the standards sitting right there on my desk, and I show them to people who raise concerns about them,” Lehner says. “And I say “Exactly which one of these standards do you object to?’ And I have yet to have anyone say ‘This one, on page six. This is a bad standard.’”

There are plenty of other defenders of the standards. Richard Ross, the Kasich-backed state superintendent of public instruction, is a staunch supporter. So is the Ohio Business Roundtable, whose members include the CEOs of some of Ohio’s largest and most influential companies.

For Herb Asher, who teaches politics and government at Ohio State University, that mix of support bodes well for the Common Core.

“I think the efforts here in Ohio will not be successful to undermine or eliminate,” says Asher. But "that’s not to say there couldn’t be some tweaking.”

And indeed, there has been some tweaking. 

In the latest round of mid-budget adjustments, state lawmakers strengthened protections to keep students’ test data private. And they have prohibited expanding Ohio’s participation in multi-state standards collaborations, ensuring that science and social studies standards will be “made in Ohio.”

Listener Comments:

I agree! States should have control we all grew up just fine on the facts relinquish control at the federal level, Health care is enough give us back our freedoms.


Posted by: Brian L. (Ohio) on June 14, 2014 1:06AM
I cannot believe what I am reading! I've read and seen these standards and all that come with it. That's why I along with other parents are going to begin lighting brush fires throughout ohio and if these law makers continue to support this then we will put our support behind they're opponents who stand against it and if it becomes adopted then I will relocate my family to virginia or texas. I will not put my grand kids through this


Posted by: Paige on June 13, 2014 3:06AM
Add Your Comment
Name:

Location:

E-mail: (not published, only used to contact you about your comment)


Comments:




 
Page Options

Print this page

E-Mail this page / Send mp3

Share on Facebook



Stories with Recent Comments

Columbus groups are trying to pass a Bill of Rights to combat fracking
Its about time we make a stand against the criminal actions of an entire Indsutry.

Crystal Ball says Ohio governor's race is done
How much is the Kasich campaign paying you to keep repeating the phrase "woman who is not his wife"? Fitzgerald was in the car with a friend who happens to be f...

Plane that crashed killing Case students is a popular training aircraft
The following is incorrect. The last few words should read "UNDER maximum gross take-off weight." “They have a normal take-off speed and all those take-off...

Exploradio: The never-ending war against superbugs
Super Federico ,we are so proud of you ,and very lucky to be among your friends . Keep it up human kind needs people like you to survive .Thanks for being so d...

Ohio's Lyme disease-carrying tick population is exploding
Interesting report. The last sentence needs some editing. It isn't a good idea to "save garments carrying ticks for analysis." The garments carrying t...

Teach for America enters third year in Ohio
For more background on TFA, check out http://reconsideringtfa.wordpress.com/

Faith leaders hold week-long prayer vigil at Ohio Statehouse
I think this is the wrong link to the audio. Its Andy Chow about cigarette taxes.

A $30 million plan to turn Cleveland's Public Square from gray to green
The current plan is for the Land Bank, RTA, and Mr. Jeremy Paris to run a bus line through the new Public Square and cutting the park in half. Save Public Squar...

Medina County residents question safety of proposed natural gas pipeline
I'm very concerned about this nexus project. I've received mail requesting my permission to allow the company to survey my property. I don't understand how thi...

A small group of tea party and Democrats protest at Kasich campaign stop
Enjoyed your excellent coverage of the statehouse for sometime now, never dreamed I'd be on. The feedback from people has been great. Thank you. Doris Adams

Copyright © 2014 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

 
In Partnership With:

NPR PRI Kent State University

listen in windows media format listen in realplayer format Car Talk Hosts: Tom & Ray Magliozzi Fresh Air Host: Terry Gross A Service of Kent State University 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. NPR Senior Correspondent: Noah Adams Living on Earth Host: Steve Curwood 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. A Service of Kent State University