News

photo of downtown Cleveland
WIKIPEDIA

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, November 21st:

Dr. Mark Hurst, Ohio Department of Health
Tim Rudell / WKSU

The deadline to submit new-tech ideas to the state of Ohio to fight the opioid crisis is growing near.

The challenge includes $8 million in awards and grants. It kicked-off Oct. 18th, with proposals to be in no later than Dec. 15th. 

Dr. Mark Hurst is medical director of the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services.  He says hundreds of submissions are already in and the best of those, and of the hundreds more that are expected, will receive awards.

photo of beekeepers
PHILIP DE OLIVEIRA / WKSU

The backyard beekeeping business began in Ohio more than 150 years ago. After all that time, beekeepers still don’t agree on what to do with their hives once the weather turns cold.

There’s a saying among beekeepers: “If you talk to 100 beekeepers, you’re going to get 101 opinions.”

Larry Theurer keeps bees at the Cuyahoga County Fairgrounds. His hives are all ready for the winter now. But the unseasonably warm weather a few weeks ago meant it was still business as usual for the bees.

Rep. John Boccieri
STATE OF OHIO

Two Democratic state lawmakers are asking the Ohio Ethics Commission to clarify what rules apply to the CEOs who now run two of the state's most troubled school districts.

The CEO positions were created as part of H.B 70, which allows the state to take over districts consistently in academic emergency.

The emergence of police body cameras has caused several communities to resolve their own questions about what is and is not public record. Lawmakers are introducing a bipartisan bill to provide a final answer.

The bill creates several exceptions to public records laws for body cameras, such as if the video shows inside a private home, private business, or shows the victim of a sex crime.

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