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photo of Greg Moody
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. John Kasich heads to Washington, D.C., later this week to meet with President Trump. One of the things they are likely to talk about is what will become of the Medicaid expansion part of the Affordable Care Act.

Office of Health Transformation Director Greg Moody says Kasich wants Trump to make sure states like Ohio that have expanded Medicaid will get the federal money to continue that expansion. But Moody acknowledges there are no guarantees at this point.

photo of Gary Mohr, Ecklund and Tavares
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Republican and Democratic lawmakers are calling for a plan that they think will help reduce the population in Ohio’s overcrowded prisons.

The bill would give judges more discretion when it comes to sentencing people who have committed fourth- and fifth-degree felonies. The plan would allow judges more flexibility on choosing community control over time behind bars.

Gary Mohr, director of the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction, says steering people away from prison will have better long-term results.

KEVIN NIEDERMIER / WKSU

With President Donald Trump preparing to unveil a revised travel ban on residents from seven mostly Muslim countries, Congresswoman Marcia Fudge visited a Cleveland mosque to voice her continued opposition.

photo of Jason Segedy
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

The plan to renovate Akron's City Center Hotel could lead to greater development in an area that’s slowly seeing people move downtown.

Cuyahoga Falls-based Testa Companies plans to invest $25 million in the building. The hotel had struggled for the past decade before closing last year. The proposed redevelopment would set aside six floors for a new hotel, and the rest for apartments.

Akron City Planner Jason Segedy says it’s one of several much-needed projects downtown, along with the Landmark Building and the United Building.

Truck and container for lquid nuclear waste
U.S. Department of Energy

Trucks carrying highly radioactive nuclear waste from Canada may soon be rolling through northeast Ohio. They’ll be bound for a disposal site at an old cold-war atomic bomb plant in South Carolina.

A decision was made at the 2007 Washington DC Nuclear Summit to “re-patriate” weapons-grade

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