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Volunteers box up food for the morning rush at the Marysville Food Pantry while Keitha Simpson stands in an aisle lined with cases of food.

“You name it—any kind of non-perishable you would want,” she says. “Canned vegetables, fruits, pastas, pasta sauce.”

Legislation that would allow terminally ill patients to get access to experimental drugs is headed to the president's desk.

The House on Tuesday passed a "right-to-try" bill that was approved by the Senate in 2017.

"People who are terminally ill should not have to go from country to country to find a cure," said Rep. Michael Burgess, R-Texas, on the House floor Tuesday.

The bill, which President Trump is expected to sign, has patient advocates divided.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Almost a year before the shooting at Columbine High School, a teenage boy wearing a trench coat walked into the Thurston High School cafeteria in Springfield, Ore. and began shooting at his fellow students.

The shooter that day, May 21, 1998, was 15-year-old Kipland Kinkel. He was armed with more than 1,000 rounds of ammunition, along with two pistols when he started firing his father's Ruger .22 caliber rifle.

Kinkel killed two students at Thurston and wounded 25 others. Later, police found Kinkel's parents' dead at home. He had shot them as well.

More coal miners in central Appalachia have suffered the advanced stages of the deadly disease black lung than previous government research has found, and more miners working in the region today have earlier stages of the disease.

Those are two of the findings in a bundle of studies released Tuesday and expected to be released soon, which focus on the epidemic of black lung disease first reported by NPR in 2016.

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