Amanda Rabinowitz

Morning Edition host/Assistant News Director

Amanda Rabinowitz has been a reporter, host and producer at WKSU since 2007. Her days begin before the sun comes up as the local anchor for NPR’s Morning Edition, which airs on WKSU each weekday from 5 a.m. to 9 a.m. In addition to providing local news and weather, she interviews the Plain Dealer’s Terry Pluto for a weekly commentary about Northeast Ohio’s sports scene.

Amanda has been honored by the Radio-Television Digital News Association with a national Edward R. Murrow Award for sports reporting for her story about painkiller addiction in college sports. She’s also been recognized as “best anchor” by Associated Press of Ohio and has won awards from the Press Club of Cleveland, Ohio Professional Writers and the National Federation of Press Women.

Amanda got her master’s degree from The University of Akron, where she teaches undergraduate classes in journalism and broadcasting.

Her free time is spent in her flower gardens at her Akron home, along with traveling to see her favorite bands in concert.  

Ways to Connect

Photo of Cleveland Cavaliers players on the court
WIKIPEDIA

The Cavs are in a familiar spot -- playing Game 3 of the NBA finals down 2-0. But a lot has changed since the NBA champs pushed the Golden State Warriors to seven games last season. WKSU Commentator Terry Pluto says that winning tonight’s game is crucial.

“No team has ever come back from a 3-0 deficit in NBA history,” he says. “In fact, what often happens is when you go down three games to none, you lose game four because the players themselves know it’s over.”

photo of Cavs home court
ERIK DROST / FLICKR

The Cavs come home down 2-0 in the NBA Finals, after losing to the Golden State Warriors on Sunday.

Golden State beat the Cavs 132-113 with strong performances from Steph Curry and Kevin Durant. It's the second consecutive year Golden State won the first two games of the Finals. Last year, Cleveland rallied to win last year's series in seven games.

LeBron James said even though they lost, the Cavs were much more physical on Sunday than they were in Game 1. LeBron acknowledged there's room for improvement in upcoming games.

NRML GRL
NRML GRL

A performance tonight at one of Akron’s underground venues blends experimental music and visual art.

For this week’s Shuffle, The Devil Strip magazine’s music editor Brittany Nader says the show is organized by Hive Mind, which is one of Akron’s do-it-yourself spaces that showcases independent artists.

photo of Kevin Love, Kyrie Irving, and LeBron James
WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

The Cavs trailed by 10 points at halftime in game four of the Eastern Conference Finals against the Celtics. Then Terry Pluto says the 'Big Three" came through.

"In the third quarter, the whole game just turned around," Terry Pluto says.

Pluto says the credit goes to LeBron James, Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love.

Irving scored a remarkable 42 points in the game, a career playoff high. Love had 17 rebounds, also unprecedented for him in a playoff game.

photo of Cavs home court
ERIK DROST / FLICKR

Here’s how Terry Pluto sums up game three of the playoffs:

“The Cavs just suddenly decided, ‘Well, we can just go home.’ And they pretty much did, mentally.”

The Cavs blew a 21-point lead in Cleveland on Sunday, ultimately losing by a mere three points to the Boston Celtics. 

Pluto somehow knew this would happen.

“Even in basketball, pride and arrogance are deadly sins,” he says.

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