Andy Chow

Statehouse Reporter

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

 

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission's Fellowship program as a production assistant for "The Ohio Channel."

 

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

Ways to Connect

Perry Nuclear Plant
Jerry Sharp / Shutterstock

The owner of Ohio’s nuclear plants has taken the next step in its plans to shut down those facilities as part of its bankruptcy filing. But FirstEnergy says there’s still time to reverse course.

Photo of Ohio Gov. John Kasich
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. John Kasich is taking his message for tougher gun control to the county level. A new executive order urges clerks of courts and other agencies to do a better job entering criminal information into the background check system. Kasich says too many criminals are slipping through the cracks.

 

Kasich points out there have been several mass shootings in which a person was supposed to be banned from buying a gun, but their information was never put into the national database for background checks.

 

FLICKR

School districts around the state were forced to change their standardized testing schedules because of a system malfunction. Ohio’s testing vendor, AIR, told the state that students were not able to log-in and access their tests. One lawmaker says this is an example of a bigger issue he’s concerned about.

Ohio Business Competes website screen shot
OhioBusinessCompetes.org

Business groups are calling on lawmakers to pass a bill that would add sexual orientation and gender identity as protected classes in discrimination laws. The coalition of companies sees added benefits beyond civil rights.

A photo of Secretary of State Jon Husted (R-Ohio) casting an early in-person absentee ballot at the Franklin County Board of Elections early voting center.
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio voters are a week into early voting for the May primary. They're deciding hundreds of local issues, a major statewide issue on how Congressional maps are drawn and the party candidates for five major statewide offices. 

Ohio’s top elections official, Secretary of State Jon Husted, urges people to vote while acknowledging that there’s usually low turnout in primaries – on average, under 30 percent.

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