Andy Chow

Statehouse Reporter

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

 

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission's Fellowship program as a production assistant for "The Ohio Channel."

 

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

Ways to Connect

photo of payday lending storefront
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Credit unions are disagreeing with claims that they will directly benefit from a new bill that’s written to crack down on the payday lending industry. As the credit unions argue, they’re already operating from a different, tough set of rules.

Payday lenders have claimed the Senate’s version of the payday lending crackdown would create an unlevel playing field.

photo of pension meeting
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Members of the U.S. Congress left Capitol Hill and held a special meeting in Columbus on the national pension crisis. Pension plans for more than 1 million union workers and retirees are in danger of collapse if something isn’t done soon. More than 60,000 Ohio workers could be impacted.

photo of pension rally
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Thousands of union workers and retirees flocked to the Statehouse from around the country. They’re rallying in Columbus for a fix to what they see as a national pension crisis – the day before a field hearing by a Congressional committee examining the issue. The labor groups say, without a change, their funds will dry up.

Teamsters, coal miners, and workers from various other industries are calling on Congress to pass a bill that will save their pensions.

photo of rainy day fund presentation
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state has deposited more than $650 million into the rainy day fund. Despite being a large pot of money, Gov. John Kasich is warning state leaders to leave it alone.

Focusing on adding money to the budget stabilization fund, also known as the rainy day fund, has been a priority for Kasich since taking office. Now the state has slightly less than $2.7 billion in its reserve.

Kasich urges that this money is only to help cushion the fall from an economic downturn.

photo of Senate Finance Committee
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A bill to overhaul the payday lending industry in Ohio is heading back to the House after the Senate approved the legislation with some changes. Consumer advocates are touting this as sensible reform while lenders argue this will put them out of business. 

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