Andy Chow

Statehouse Reporter

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

 

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission's Fellowship program as a production assistant for "The Ohio Channel."

 

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

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photo of Senate Finance Committee
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A bill to overhaul the payday lending industry in Ohio is heading back to the House after the Senate approved the legislation with some changes. Consumer advocates are touting this as sensible reform while lenders argue this will put them out of business. 

photo of Senate Finance Committee
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Senate is introducing changes to a payday lending crackdown that passed the House by a big margin. Supporters of the legislation say it will help shutdown predatory lending and a cycle of debt.

The Senate's changes raise the maximum payday loan amount to $1,000. The bill also caps the principal and fees on those loans at 7% of the borrower’s monthly income, and says total costs, meaning fees and interest rates, cannot be more than 60% of the original loan.

photo of Rich Cordray and Mike DeWine
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Republican and the Democrat running for governor are laying out their plans for how to help children succeed. Both Mike DeWine and Rich Cordray say it all begins before the kids are even born. However Cordray sees one clear difference between his take and that of his opponent.

photo of Libertarian petitioners
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

After failing to qualify candidates for the statewide ballot for the last two election cycles, Libertarians are fighting to regain their party status in Ohio. The group has filed more than 100,000 signatures to put that party designation back on the ballot.

After the Republican-controlled legislature changed ballot access laws in 2013, the Libertarian Party of Ohio lost its minor party status and could no longer have nominees appear on the ballot with their party name attached.

photo of Richard Cordray
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Richard Cordray is laying out how he plans to help children and parents if elected governor.

The Democratic gubernatorial nominee says there’s at least one distinct difference between his plan and that of his Republican opponent Mike DeWine, which he laid out last week.

Cordray wants to increase access to state intervention services, helping parents with young children.

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