Andy Chow

Statehouse Reporter

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

 

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission's Fellowship program as a production assistant for "The Ohio Channel."

 

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

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photo of the Ohio Board of Education
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

High schools around the state are facing a crucial dilemma as about a third of their students are not on track to graduate. That’s based on the new graduation standards that begin with the class of 2018.

Leaders are scrambling to find a way to remedy the approaching crisis.

The meeting of the State Board of Education in Columbus this week was not our typical monthly meeting. This time, the futures of thousands of students were potentially on the line, as board members debated what to do with Ohio’s high-school graduation requirements.

photo of Teresa Long
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Some of the biggest players in the fight against Ohio’s opioid abuse told business leaders that the epidemic might be closer than they think and warned them to be prepared.

The top health official in Columbus wants everyone to have Naloxone. City Health Commissioner Teresa Long says many people might brush off the overdose-reversing drug as something only addicts or their family or friends should have.

Long warned during a Columbus Metropolitan Club forum that anyone could be in a position to have to save a life.

photo of Perry Nuclear Plant
JERRY SHARP / SHUTTERSTOCK

One of Ohio’s largest utilities is once again going to state lawmakers for a way to get a boost for its struggling power plants. 

FirstEnergy wants state lawmakers to give it the ability to charge its customers about $5 more a month. The utility’s Jennifer Young says the company's struggling nuclear plants deserve a subsidy for emitting zero carbon.

“It’s the best interest of communities in the state, and while there may be a small premium for that we think that is the right thing to do.”

photo of the Columbus YMCA
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A collection of community service groups is hoping they can get a tax break from the state with the help of a new bill. The measure would boost gyms like the YMCA.

The whirring of treadmills and the sounds of swimming might first come to mind when you think of gyms like those at the YMCA and Jewish Community Centers.

But Beth Tsvetkoff with the Ohio Alliance of YMCA says they do so much more, such as early childhood education and diabetes prevention.

photo of Lacy Hamilton
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. John Kasich is taking the state government on the road to Sandusky for his annual State of the State speech. The city that sits on the coast of Lake Erie is preparing to tell Kasich and other leaders what they need to know about their town. There are many stories to tell, with one common thread.

Lacy Hamilton walks into Better Half Diner, a local Sandusky spot, and sits down at a table with a cup of coffee and the daily newspaper.

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