Andy Chow

Statehouse Reporter

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

 

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission's Fellowship program as a production assistant for "The Ohio Channel."

 

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

Ways to Connect

Photos of Joe Schiavoni, Richard Cordray, Justice Bill O'Neill and Dennis Kucinich.
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The four major Democratic candidates running for governor in Tuesday’s primary are making their cases to voters in the last days of this campaign.

Former AG and Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Richard Cordray, former Cleveland Mayor and former Congressman Dennis Kucinich, state Sen. Joe Schiavoni and former Ohio Supreme Court Justice Bill O’Neill all say they’ll be focusing on grass-roots campaigning.

Ohio Democratic Party Chair David Pepper says the candidates will need to motivate their voters since the party didn’t endorse any of them.

Emilie Zhang / Shutterstock

With the opioid crisis killing an estimated 11 Ohioans a day, state medical boards are rolling out additional rules for doctors and other prescribers who have patients dealing with long-term and acute pain. The guidelines create new hurdles to jump over before a doctor can prescribe opioid-based painkillers. 

The new requirements ask doctors to evaluate a patient’s condition, look for signs of drug misuse, and consider consultation with a pain specialist.

gavel
Shutterstock

Communities could stand to save tens of millions of dollars if the state moves to reform its bail system. A new report says, aside from issues of fairness and public safety, changing Ohio’s bail system means a huge cut to jail costs. 

A photo of voting machines.
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

We’re less than a week from Election Day, and Ohio voters are on pace for a bigger turnout than the May primary in 2014. 

More than 128,000 people have cast ballots already, and Secretary of State Jon Husted says there are still more than 90,000 absentee ballots that were requested but have yet to be sent back. This outpaces the 2014 primary, when nearly 183,000 ballots were requested.

There were no major statewide races in that primary.        

Photo of Steve Dyer from Innovation Ohio
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Longtime critics of the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, the now-closed but still controversial online charter school, say that more employees would come forward with accusations of student data manipulation had they not signed contracts with non-disclosure agreements attached.

Steve Dyer with the liberal think tank Innovation Ohio says these so-called non-disclosure agreements signed by ECOT employees cover up any possible data fraud with public money.

Pages