Andy Chow

Statehouse Reporter

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

 

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission's Fellowship program as a production assistant for "The Ohio Channel."

 

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

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photo of Bill Lager
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Attorney General has filed an argument in court claiming ECOT’s agreements with its management and software service companies constitute a pattern of corrupt activity. And the claim backs up complaints Democratic lawmakers have lodged for years.

photo of DeWine ECOT protest
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Education advocates held a small rally outside of Attorney General Mike DeWine’s office, calling for him to investigate the now-closed Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow. Democrats are trying to connect the Republican gubernatorial nominee to the online charter school scandal. There’s a back-and-forth on the ECOT debate that will likely last the entire campaign season.

Photo of medical marijuana
Shutterstock.com

For the first time, a company has been given the go-ahead to start growing marijuana in Ohio. The group just received an official cultivator license from the state. Now more than a dozen other companies are lined up for inspections, though, the state’s medical marijuana program is still behind schedule.

WellSpring Fields in Portage County will start growing marijuana for medical purposes after receiving the state’s first cultivator license.

The state has a whole slate of inspections scheduled, including seven more in July.

photo of Senate President Larry Obhof
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The U.S. Supreme Court ruling on union laws caused a national stir and sent a shock wave to labor groups in Ohio.

Some Republican lawmakers have been trying to pass bills around unions and collective bargaining for years. According to the top Senate leader, now they no longer have to.

Several so-called “Right to Work” bills have been proposed since a collective bargaining reform law was overturned in 2011.

These are measures that would make it illegal to require an employee to pay union dues in order to work.

photo of Ohio Senate chamber
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio House and Senate sent two bills to the governor that attempt to clean up the state’s online charter school system. Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle believe this is an important step toward more transparency and accountability.

The measures are in response to the closing of ECOT, which was the state’s largest online charter school.

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