Andy Chow

Statehouse Reporter

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

 

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission's Fellowship program as a production assistant for "The Ohio Channel."

 

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

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Andy Chow / Statehouse News Bureau

There are renewed fears that state lawmakers will freeze Medicaid expansion in Ohio now that latest attempt to overhaul the federal health care law has folded.

The last time the House considered holding a vote to freeze Medicaid expansion through a veto override, Republican leaders said they would wait to see what kind of changes Congress might make on federal health care.

Faye Childs of Columbus who’s battling a rare form of cancer, is concerned that the issue is back on the table in the Statehouse and could threaten her coverage.

Picture of John Kasich
ANDY CHOW / StATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Hot off another round of appearances on the national media circle, Gov. John Kasich was back in Ohio again, meeting with a large group of newspaper editors from publications around the U.S. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, Kasich had a message about the importance of journalism.

While speaking to editors with Gatehouse Media, a group of newspapers including the Dispatch, Repository and former Dix publications in Ohio, Kasich reiterated his support for immigration reform and a bipartisan health-care plan.

(left) Franklin County Recorder Danny O’Connor and (right) Rep. Hearcel Craig (D-Columbus) discuss bill allowing homeowners, attorneys or title companies request redaction of discriminatory deed language.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

State lawmakers want to make it easier for county recorders to change racist and discriminatory language in old housing documents brought to them by a homeowner, an attorney or a title company. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, deeds to houses can still reflect blemishes in a neighborhood’s history.

Picture of Unemployment Compensation
Andy Chow

The state seems to be one step closer to a plan that would make changes to the way the state funds the program that pays benefits to unemployed workers. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, the next step is getting both labor and business to approve the idea.

 

 

 

Republican House Speaker Pro Tempore Kirk Schuring says he’s put together a plan that could save the unemployment compensation fund from taking another hit like the one in 2008 when the state had to borrow billions of dollars from the feds.

 

Iberdrola Renewable

The wind-energy industry says Ohio has essentially placed a moratorium on new wind farm projects because of trestrictions on where turbines can be placed. But some lawmakers maintain those tougher parameters protect the rights of landowners.

So-called wind setbacks decide how far a turbine must be placed from a property owner who wants nothing to do with a project.

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