Andy Chow

Statehouse Reporter

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

 

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission's Fellowship program as a production assistant for "The Ohio Channel."

 

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

Ways to Connect

payday loans protest
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Community groups rallied to show their support for a bipartisan bill they think is needed to slow predatory lending in Ohio. 

The bill would cap the interest rate of payday lenders at 28 percent and close any loopholes around that cap. In spite of previous reforms, some of those loans have interest rates approaching 600 percent.

textbooks
WIKIPEDIA

Buying textbooks can cost college students hundreds and even thousands of dollars every semester. Some state lawmakers see this as a burden beyond already high out-of-pocket expenses. But now there’s a plan to try to lighten the load.

A House committee has opened debate on a bill that would exempt college text books from the sales tax.

Republican Rep. Mike Duffey says this can just be one step in the effort to make college more affordable.

ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

For the first time since lawmakers required it in the budget, Gov. John Kasich’s administration made a trip to the Ohio Statehouse to ask a panel of legislators to release hundreds of millions of dollars to fund Medicaid

Photo of House Republican leaders
Andy Chow / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio is trying to stabilize its unemployment benefit fund, which went deeply in debt to the feds in 2008,. And both business and labor leaders agree it needs an overhaul. But they have mixed feelings over a plan state lawmakers are considering.

Republican Rep. Kirk Schuring took the ideas he heard in a working group among labor and business leaders and put them into a bill.

He notes both sides have things they like and don’t like in it.

Photo of Christina Hagan
Andy Chow

Lawmakers call it a silent epidemic as an alarming number of children are sexually abused but don’t feel safe enough to ask for help.

 

A bipartisan bill in the House would require sexual-abuse education so kids can learn the difference between good touch and bad touch and connect to resources if they feeln they’re being abused. Republican Rep. Christina Hagan of Alliance says kids don’t speak out because they’re afraid of what their attackers might do.

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