Jeff St. Clair

All Things Considered host, Exploradio

A career in radio was a surprising turn for me seeing that my first love was science. I studied chemistry at the University of Akron and for 13 years lived the quiet life of an analytical chemist in the Akron area,listening to WKSU all the while in the lab.

A few small explosions and chemical spills helped me decide that it was time to look for a new career. In 1998 I landed a part-time position at WKSU and began hosting the Sunday local performance show, In Performance. The magic of radio did its work on me, and in December 2000 I permanently shed the lab-coat to join WKSU full-time and have never looked back.

As the local host of NPR's All Things Considered, I love connecting with listeners as they’re heading home.  It’s a privilege to introduce listeners to the fascinating guests, artists, experts, and news makers that are heard each day on NPR.  It’s a conversation that enriches us all.

I’m also thrilled to share my love of science with listeners through Exploradio, along with reporting on the environment, business, and politics.

Reporting the news is perfect for someone like me because I’m intensely curious ( i.e. nosy)  and have a very short attention span! I'm grateful to have found my niche.

WKSU is one of those rare places where creativity and technology come together to create a product that touches your intellect and your soul—it makes you laugh and carries you through times of reflection.

I sometimes imagine that a young person listening today will be inspired to make the world a better place because of something he or she heard on WKSU. I'm extremely proud to be part of one of the best stations in the public radio system.

I live in Kent with my wife and my three wonderful children.

Ways to Connect

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Akron's St. Thomas Hospital was the first in the world to admit alcoholics for treatment. That was in the early days of Alcoholics Anonymous.

A doctor carrying on that tradition at that hospital today has an inside understanding of what it takes to get sober. On this Week’s Exploradio, Dr. Nicole Labor shares her insights on treating addiction .

CLEVELAND CLINIC

Doctors in Cleveland have for the first time implanted electrodes in the brain of a partially paralyzed patient in order to help them regain movement lost to a stroke. It’s the latest example of how researchers are pushing the boundaries of a new field of medicine.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at the novel uses of deep-brain stimulation.

Our lives are immersed in materials and inventions that got their start in a lab somewhere.  But there’s often a sizable gap in our grasp of science and innovation compared to its impact on our daily lives. Exploradio delves deep into groundbreaking research to share stories of science and discovery and bridge the gap between the science that surrounds us and our understanding of it.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Today’s entrepreneurs are developing new models for launching a business. There’s more emphasis on collaboration than ever before.  And a new group in Akron is working to bring together the elements entrepreneurs need to succeed.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at how Launch League is feeding Akron’s start-up ecosystem.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

The generation of African-Americans who lived under Jim Crow is dying off, but the impact of segregation lives on according to sociologist Ruth Thompson-Miller. 

She teaches at the University of Dayton and spoke this week at Kent State University.

Her work focuses on what she calls segregation stress syndrome, a collective legacy of living in a two-tiered society.

Ruth Thompson-Miller began her research career collecting the stories of elderly black Americans who grew up in the Jim Crow era of segregation.

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