Jeff St. Clair

All Things Considered host, Exploradio

A career in radio was a surprising turn for me seeing that my first love was science. I studied chemistry at the University of Akron and for 13 years lived the quiet life of an analytical chemist in the Akron area,listening to WKSU all the while in the lab.

A few small explosions and chemical spills helped me decide that it was time to look for a new career. In 1998 I landed a part-time position at WKSU and began hosting the Sunday local performance show, In Performance. The magic of radio did its work on me, and in December 2000 I permanently shed the lab-coat to join WKSU full-time and have never looked back.

As the local host of NPR's All Things Considered, I love connecting with listeners as they’re heading home.  It’s a privilege to introduce listeners to the fascinating guests, artists, experts, and news makers that are heard each day on NPR.  It’s a conversation that enriches us all.

I’m also thrilled to share my love of science with listeners through Exploradio, along with reporting on the environment, business, and politics.

Reporting the news is perfect for someone like me because I’m intensely curious ( i.e. nosy)  and have a very short attention span! I'm grateful to have found my niche.

WKSU is one of those rare places where creativity and technology come together to create a product that touches your intellect and your soul—it makes you laugh and carries you through times of reflection.

I sometimes imagine that a young person listening today will be inspired to make the world a better place because of something he or she heard on WKSU. I'm extremely proud to be part of one of the best stations in the public radio system.

I live in Kent with my wife and my three wonderful children.

Ways to Connect

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Northeast Ohio has some of the best medical care available in the U.S., but parts of Cleveland also have some of the nation’s highest rates of infant mortality.

First Year Cleveland is a new effort to reverse those trends.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at how race factors into infant mortality and what’s being done to change it.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

He was Egypt’s most famous composer, a pioneer in modern music, and a creative force at Kent State University for more than four decades.

Composer and music researcher Halim El-Dabh died over the weekend. He was 96 years old.

A career in music came as sort of a surprise for El-Dabh. In 1940’s Cairo, he was training to be an agricultural engineer, but all the while he studied and wrote music

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Nearly 25 million Americans -- about 8 percent of the population -- have asthma.  It effects more than one million Ohioans.

While people suffering from asthma may not be aware of it, a Cleveland researcher has discovered, there's a potentially protective aspect of the disease.

On this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at what may be asthma’s silver lining.

JANET KAVANDI
NASA

On Monday, the moon will cross in front of the sun and cast a shadow across the length of the U.S., sweeping east from Oregon all the way to the Carolina coast.

A narrow band between those points will experience a total eclipse, but even Ohio will see about 80 percent of the sun covered by the moon starting around 1 p.m. on Monday.

NASA is gearing up for the big event, NASA Glenn Director Janet Kavandi joins us.

It’s the namesake of the mythical goddess and synonymous with feminine beauty, but the reality of the planet Venus is anything but gentle.

Conditions on the surface are so harsh that all of our efforts to study it over the decades have provided only scant details.

But researchers in Cleveland are trying to change that.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at efforts to bring a little bit of Venus to planet Earth.

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