Jeff St. Clair

All Things Considered host, Exploradio

A career in radio was a surprising turn for me seeing that my first love was science. I studied chemistry at the University of Akron and for 13 years lived the quiet life of an analytical chemist in the Akron area,listening to WKSU all the while in the lab.

A few small explosions and chemical spills helped me decide that it was time to look for a new career. In 1998 I landed a part-time position at WKSU and began hosting the Sunday local performance show, In Performance. The magic of radio did its work on me, and in December 2000 I permanently shed the lab-coat to join WKSU full-time and have never looked back.

As the local host of NPR's All Things Considered, I love connecting with listeners as they’re heading home.  It’s a privilege to introduce listeners to the fascinating guests, artists, experts, and news makers that are heard each day on NPR.  It’s a conversation that enriches us all.

I’m also thrilled to share my love of science with listeners through Exploradio, along with reporting on the environment, business, and politics.

Reporting the news is perfect for someone like me because I’m intensely curious ( i.e. nosy)  and have a very short attention span! I'm grateful to have found my niche.

WKSU is one of those rare places where creativity and technology come together to create a product that touches your intellect and your soul—it makes you laugh and carries you through times of reflection.

I sometimes imagine that a young person listening today will be inspired to make the world a better place because of something he or she heard on WKSU. I'm extremely proud to be part of one of the best stations in the public radio system.

I live in Kent with my wife and my three wonderful children.

Ways to Connect

FLICKR CC

Scientists are devising new ways to predict the effects that climate change will have on the earth. Rising sea levels and unpredictable weather patterns are some of the large- scale outcomes, but in this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at how climate change is playing out on a much smaller scale.

OHIO HOUSE

A northeast Ohio lawmaker was one of a dozen House Republicans who voted against the two-year, $63.7 billion state budget this week.

WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair reports that changes to charter school oversight is one of the reasons behind Kristina Roegner’s no vote.

First, Roegner, whose 37th House district covers northern Summit County, lists things that she liked about the bill.

FLICKR CC

A 4,000 year-old medical tradition from India is the inspiration for a local researcher who’s looking for new ways to treat and prevent arthritis. 

In the lab he’s unlocking the healing properties of herbs, fruits, and flowers.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair explores how modern science is revealing the ancient secrets of Ayurveda.

MARC MEYERS

The film version of the graphic novel "My Friend Dahmer" opens tonight at New York’s Tribeca Film Festival.

Author John Backderf went to high school with Jeffrey Dahmer, and his book is a recollection of their teen years before Dahmer became a serial killer.

He paints a nuanced portrait of Dahmer’s slow slide into depravity in 1970’s Ohio.

MARCH FOR SCIENCE

Five hundred cities around the world are staging demonstrations this weekend to promote awareness of and investments in science. The March For Science includes 12 cities in Ohio.

WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair reports that scientists are feeling the need to speak out.

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