Jeff St. Clair

All Things Considered host, Exploradio

A career in radio was a surprising turn for me seeing that my first love was science. I studied chemistry at the University of Akron and for 13 years lived the quiet life of an analytical chemist in the Akron area,listening to WKSU all the while in the lab.

A few small explosions and chemical spills helped me decide that it was time to look for a new career. In 1998 I landed a part-time position at WKSU and began hosting the Sunday local performance show, In Performance. The magic of radio did its work on me, and in December 2000 I permanently shed the lab-coat to join WKSU full-time and have never looked back.

As the local host of NPR's All Things Considered, I love connecting with listeners as they’re heading home.  It’s a privilege to introduce listeners to the fascinating guests, artists, experts, and news makers that are heard each day on NPR.  It’s a conversation that enriches us all.

I’m also thrilled to share my love of science with listeners through Exploradio, along with reporting on the environment, business, and politics.

Reporting the news is perfect for someone like me because I’m intensely curious ( i.e. nosy)  and have a very short attention span! I'm grateful to have found my niche.

WKSU is one of those rare places where creativity and technology come together to create a product that touches your intellect and your soul—it makes you laugh and carries you through times of reflection.

I sometimes imagine that a young person listening today will be inspired to make the world a better place because of something he or she heard on WKSU. I'm extremely proud to be part of one of the best stations in the public radio system.

I live in Kent with my wife and my three wonderful children.

Ways to Connect


The Village of Lakemore and Springfield Township now have their own library. The Akron-Summit County Public Library is opening a branch there this weekend.

The new location was made possible by a county-wide levy passed in 2015.

Outgoing library Director David Jennings says the opening marks one of his final goals.


A Cleveland researcher has received $11 million to test a promising technique to rid the body of the virus that causes AIDS. The therapy offers hope for the 1.1 million people in the U.S. living with HIV, especially the roughly 10 percent of patients who don’t respond to antiretroviral drugs.


NASA’s Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot has announced the agency’s proposed budget for the next fiscal year.  The nearly $20 billion spending blueprint focuses on a new mission to the moon.

A prominent piece of that lunar exploration plan is being built in Cleveland, as WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair reports.


Over the next few months, the Cleveland Museum of Natural History is celebrating the work of women scientists.

The kick-off included an unusual examination of the role of gender.

In this week’s Exploradio, we look at the series, and profiles one of the featured female scientists.

The Celebrating Women in Science series welcomes visitors with portraits of female scientists… in disguise.

photo of Fidaa Musleh and daughter Lina
M.L. Schultze / WKSU

Amer Adi's family held a news conference Thursday evening outside the private federal prison where Adi has been held since last Friday. He was transferred there from the Geauga County jail after he started a hunger strike to protest his surprise detention in Jan. 16. WKSU's M.L. Schultze spoke afterwards with All Things Considered host Jeff St. Clair about the family's news conference and the latest on the decision by Immigrations and Customs Enforcement to disregard a request for a stay from the U.S.