Jeff St. Clair

All Things Considered host, Exploradio

A career in radio was a surprising turn for me seeing that my first love was science. I studied chemistry at the University of Akron and for 13 years lived the quiet life of an analytical chemist in the Akron area,listening to WKSU all the while in the lab.

A few small explosions and chemical spills helped me decide that it was time to look for a new career. In 1998 I landed a part-time position at WKSU and began hosting the Sunday local performance show, In Performance. The magic of radio did its work on me, and in December 2000 I permanently shed the lab-coat to join WKSU full-time and have never looked back.

As the local host of NPR's All Things Considered, I love connecting with listeners as they’re heading home.  It’s a privilege to introduce listeners to the fascinating guests, artists, experts, and news makers that are heard each day on NPR.  It’s a conversation that enriches us all.

I’m also thrilled to share my love of science with listeners through Exploradio, along with reporting on the environment, business, and politics.

Reporting the news is perfect for someone like me because I’m intensely curious ( i.e. nosy)  and have a very short attention span! I'm grateful to have found my niche.

WKSU is one of those rare places where creativity and technology come together to create a product that touches your intellect and your soul—it makes you laugh and carries you through times of reflection.

I sometimes imagine that a young person listening today will be inspired to make the world a better place because of something he or she heard on WKSU. I'm extremely proud to be part of one of the best stations in the public radio system.

I live in Kent with my wife and my three wonderful children.

Ways to Connect

MAHMOUD GHANNOUM / CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have revealed how interactions between bacteria and fungi in the human gut exacerbate the symptoms of Crohn’s disease.

The discovery may lead to new ways of treating the debilitating intestinal disorder.

OHIO EPA

The Cuyahoga River was once the symbol of America’s neglect of its natural resources.  But the river that burned has bounced back and continues to improve.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair joins a group of scientists detailing the recovery of our crooked river.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

The Ohio EPA on Wednesday turned over of $2.3 million in civil penalties against the owners of the Rover pipeline enforcement to the Ohio Attorney General’s office.

WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair reports on the latest in ongoing disputes with the pipeline operators.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Northeast Ohio has some of the best medical care available in the U.S., but parts of Cleveland also have some of the nation’s highest rates of infant mortality.

First Year Cleveland is a new effort to reverse those trends.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at how race factors into infant mortality and what’s being done to change it.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

He was Egypt’s most famous composer, a pioneer in modern music, and a creative force at Kent State University for more than four decades.

Composer and music researcher Halim El-Dabh died over the weekend. He was 96 years old.

A career in music came as sort of a surprise for El-Dabh. In 1940’s Cairo, he was training to be an agricultural engineer, but all the while he studied and wrote music

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