Jeff St. Clair

All Things Considered host, Exploradio

A career in radio was a surprising turn for me seeing that my first love was science. I studied chemistry at the University of Akron and for 13 years lived the quiet life of an analytical chemist in the Akron area,listening to WKSU all the while in the lab.

A few small explosions and chemical spills helped me decide that it was time to look for a new career. In 1998 I landed a part-time position at WKSU and began hosting the Sunday local performance show, In Performance. The magic of radio did its work on me, and in December 2000 I permanently shed the lab-coat to join WKSU full-time and have never looked back.

As the local host of NPR's All Things Considered, I love connecting with listeners as they’re heading home.  It’s a privilege to introduce listeners to the fascinating guests, artists, experts, and news makers that are heard each day on NPR.  It’s a conversation that enriches us all.

I’m also thrilled to share my love of science with listeners through Exploradio, along with reporting on the environment, business, and politics.

Reporting the news is perfect for someone like me because I’m intensely curious ( i.e. nosy)  and have a very short attention span! I'm grateful to have found my niche.

WKSU is one of those rare places where creativity and technology come together to create a product that touches your intellect and your soul—it makes you laugh and carries you through times of reflection.

I sometimes imagine that a young person listening today will be inspired to make the world a better place because of something he or she heard on WKSU. I'm extremely proud to be part of one of the best stations in the public radio system.

I live in Kent with my wife and my three wonderful children.

Ways to Connect

The Power of NO

Aug 24, 2015

People breathe in oxygen and exhale carbon dioxide - that’s the respiratory cycle as it’s long been known. 

But researchers in Cleveland say there’s more to the story, and it may be time to rewrite the text books.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair reports that one other gas is necessary for life.

 

 

Dynamite and chest pains
What do dynamite, Viagra, and new born babies all have in common?

They all use the power of NO.

MET MUSEUM / MET MUSEUM

Around the time Stonehenge was being built in England, native peoples here in Ohio were building more humble structures. But an excavation this summer of an ancient settlement in Sheffield Village shows that early Ohioans lived pretty comfortably here 4,000 years ago.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at how a first-of-its-kind discovery is shedding new light on archaic Ohio.

 

 

It’s been called the miracle material - strong, lightweight, flexible, bendable, super-conducting, transparent - graphene is also among the most hyped materials known.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at local research in graphene, and tries to separate the promise from the fluff surrounding the world’s newest wonder material.

 

Two sides of the brain
aboutmodafinil.com

Organizational theorist Richard Boyatzis was recently named one of the world’s most influential thinkers in human resources management.

But Boytzis does not think of employees as "resources."  He says they’re people, and effective managers treat them that way.  

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair sat down with Boyatzis to learn how a manager’s way of thinking can either motivate people or shut them down.

 

A group of black students at Kent State University is taking a special interest in the work of one of the school’s psychology professors. Angela Neal-Barnett is studying how the accusation of ‘acting white’ affects a young person’s identity.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair explores how a simple statement impacts what it means to be black in America.

 

Savannah McCarthy is a broadcast journalism major at Kent State University. She moved a lot growing up, and she says being a black girl who excelled in school often set her apart.

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