Jeff St. Clair

All Things Considered host, Exploradio

A career in radio was a surprising turn for me seeing that my first love was science. I studied chemistry at the University of Akron and for 13 years lived the quiet life of an analytical chemist in the Akron area,listening to WKSU all the while in the lab.

A few small explosions and chemical spills helped me decide that it was time to look for a new career. In 1998 I landed a part-time position at WKSU and began hosting the Sunday local performance show, In Performance. The magic of radio did its work on me, and in December 2000 I permanently shed the lab-coat to join WKSU full-time and have never looked back.

As the local host of NPR's All Things Considered, I love connecting with listeners as they’re heading home.  It’s a privilege to introduce listeners to the fascinating guests, artists, experts, and news makers that are heard each day on NPR.  It’s a conversation that enriches us all.

I’m also thrilled to share my love of science with listeners through Exploradio, along with reporting on the environment, business, and politics.

Reporting the news is perfect for someone like me because I’m intensely curious ( i.e. nosy)  and have a very short attention span! I'm grateful to have found my niche.

WKSU is one of those rare places where creativity and technology come together to create a product that touches your intellect and your soul—it makes you laugh and carries you through times of reflection.

I sometimes imagine that a young person listening today will be inspired to make the world a better place because of something he or she heard on WKSU. I'm extremely proud to be part of one of the best stations in the public radio system.

I live in Kent with my wife and my three wonderful children.

Ways to Connect

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Summit Metro Parks is moving forward with the next step in the process to remove the largest remaining dam on the Cuyahoga River.

The 60-foot-tall Gorge Dam in Cuyahoga Falls once powered trolley cars in Akron.

The park’s head of natural resources management, Mike Johnson, says the $70,000 hydrology study will model the effect of a free-flowing river.

Photo of President Donald Trump
WKYC

President Donald Trump made a push for his infrastructure plan on Thursday in Northeast Ohio.

Speaking at a union training site in Richfield, Trump called on Congress to fund his proposal for $200 billion in spending, in hopes of triggering $1.5 trillion in infrastructure investment.

He addressed the crowd, which included heavy machinery operators, at the International Union of Operating Engineers training facility.

“Anything we can dream, you can build," Trump told the crowd.

UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS

University Hospital's fertility clinic says it had been experiencing problems with a storage tank for several weeks before it malfunctioned last month and ruined more than 4,000 eggs and embryos. It's twice the number originally reported by the hospital.

University Hospitals says the problem forced the clinic's staff to manually fill liquid nitrogen into the tank to keep the embryos frozen.

UH also says an alarm system was turned off on a storage tank that should have alerted staff to changes in the temperature on March 4.

UH CEO Tom Zenty issued an apology on Tuesday via a video posted on Facebook.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Computer technology is expanding at a dizzying pace.  Things that seemed like science fiction a few years ago – from artificial intelligence to cryptocurrencies - are now common place.

It’s a bewildering landscape – but in this week’s Exploradio, we follow the thread of a new computer technology from the desktop to deep space.

NINA SCHUBERT

Gov. John Kasich singled out the activism of a Kent State University student during his final State of the State address on tonight.

Kasich gave freshman Antonina Schubert a “Courage Award” for her work in mental-health support.

She’s founder of the Nightingale Project, which helps people with depression, and seeks to end the stigma associated with mental disorders.

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