Jo Ingles

Statehouse Reporter

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, WOSU Radio’s “All Sides with Ann Fisher” and other radio and television shows throughout the state. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service. She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo is also the media adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University, “Transcript” newspaper. She also teaches radio productions courses there. She lives in southern Delaware County with her husband, Roger, and two children.

Ways to Connect

photo of Rep. David LeLand
OGT / OHIO CHANNEL

Democrats in the state Legislature are supporting a new bill that would officially denounce white nationalists and neo-Nazis.

Democratic Rep. David Leland’s bill would recognize white nationalists, neo-Nazis and white supremacist groups as terrorist organizations. And it would direct police to track those groups, as they do other similar ones.

“These people are terrorists, and we need to treat them as such and we need to call them out.”

photo of Rachel Peterson
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Facebook plans to build its 10th data center in New Albany in central Ohio, to open in 2019. The $750 million project comes with a mixture of local and state funding incentives.

Facebook’s Rachel Peterson says the project, which will get unspecified local and state tax credits, will be good for Ohio.

Marijuana leaf
Statehouse News Bureau

  

Investors who want a license to grow medical marijuana for Ohio’s new program will have to wait until November to find out whether they will receive one. 

Investors had hoped to find out by September whether they would be awarded one of the 24 cultivator’s licenses.The Ohio Department of Commerce’s Justin Hunt says based on the volume, the decisions on the licenses won’t come until November. But he says the September date was never promised.

Facebook logo
FACEBOOK

A social media giant is developing a huge data center in Central Ohio.

Online social media company Facebook is expected to announce plans next week to bring a $750 million data center to Central Ohio. 

Multiple sources say the company has received approval for state tax incentives for the project. It is expected to create about 50 jobs with an annual salary of about $80,000 each. Plus 1000 construction jobs are expected to be created to build the facility that’s set to open in New Albany in 2022.

Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program logo
OHIO MEDICAL MARIJUANA CONTROL PROGRAM

The state’s new medical marijuana program is supposed to begin a little more than a year from now. But there are still lots of questions, such as who will grow the plants, what conditions they’ll be grown under, and who will do lab testing on the cannabis before patients get access to it.

The state’s new medical marijuana program calls for a public university to test the plants. But, so far, none has stepped forward, although at least one private company says it will work with an unnamed public university to do the testing.  

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