Jo Ingles

Statehouse Reporter

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, WOSU Radio’s “All Sides with Ann Fisher” and other radio and television shows throughout the state. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service. She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo is also the media adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University, “Transcript” newspaper. She also teaches radio productions courses there. She lives in southern Delaware County with her husband, Roger, and two children.

Ways to Connect

A photo of Sen. Bill Coley, Republican, Sponsor of the legislation.
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio lawmakers are now weighing in with a proposed fix for problems with the process being used by the state Commerce Department in the medical marijuana program. 

Republican Sen. Bill Coley says his legislation gives Ohio’s auditor 30 days to do a full performance audit of growers’ license applications, then gives the department another month to correct problems.

“By doing this, we can remove any clouds of suspicion or impropriety or any suggestions or innuendo of impropriety.”

AUDITOR DAVID YOST
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s Auditor says it’s probably too late for the state Department of Commerce to pause its medical marijuana processes to fix problems. He’s telling the department to focus now instead on defending lawsuits.

Back in December, just days after it was discovered that the state hired a man with a felony drug conviction to score medical marijuana applications, Auditor Dave Yost called for the process to stop.

A photo of Senate President Larry Obhof.
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

There are 22 bills related to guns pending in the Ohio Legislature right now. It’s hard to predict what might happen to them after the deadly Florida school shooting last week and Gov. John Kasich’s new willingness to embrace some gun regulations.

Republican Senate President Larry Obhof isn’t saying what will happen with gun bills in the days following the deaths of 17 people at a high school in Florida. But he says lawmakers are considering ways to beef up security in Ohio’s schools.

A photo of Gary Obermiller, Assistant Director, Ohio Department of Natural Resources.
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A bipartisan bill has been introduced to make fishing, hunting and trapping licenses easier to get and more affordable in Ohio.

Gary Obermiller with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources says the bill is meant to make it easier for residents who hunt, fish or trap by making licenses available immediately after renewal.

Richard Cordray
WIKIMEDIA

The first head of the national Consumer Financial Protection Bureau says he’s concerned about the shift in direction for the agency. 

The CFPB was created in 2011, after the recession, to give consumers more protections. But former head Rich Cordray says the entire focus has changed under President Trump and the Republicans.

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