Jo Ingles

Statehouse Reporter

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, WOSU Radio’s “All Sides with Ann Fisher” and other radio and television shows throughout the state. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service. She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo is also the media adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University, “Transcript” newspaper. She also teaches radio productions courses there. She lives in southern Delaware County with her husband, Roger, and two children.

Ways to Connect

photo of Marsy's Law petitions
DAN KONIK

A group that wants Ohio to adopt a bill of victim rights has submitted signatures to put the issue on the ballot this fall.

Backers of a proposed constitutional amendment to establish a bill of rights for crime victims have filed 560,000 petitions for this fall’s ballot. That's nearly twice the number of signatures the group needs.

ECOT spokesman Neil Clark
Karen Kasler / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio's largest online charter school is making drastic job cuts to help pay the $60 million it owes the state. 

Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow spokesman Neil Clark says the cuts are needed to pay back 60 percent of the $100 million the school got from the state last year.

“They have proposed laying off up to 350 people in the next 30 to 60 days,” Clark says.

photo of drugs
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A new analysis from the Associated Press shows Medicaid expansion accounted for 43 percent of total Ohio Medicaid spending on substance abuse and mental health treatment. Advocates for the poor worry a proposed amendment in the state Senate budget that would end Medicaid expansion enrollment would be a disaster for Ohio’s opioid crisis. 

photo of Gov. John Kasich
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

An income tax break for Ohio’s small businesses in recent years is under fire from Democrats and some Republicans. They say the current budget situation shows it’s time to end that tax cut. Gov. John Kasich is firmly rejecting those suggestions.

photo of Governor John Kasich at human trafficking event
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Some of the officers that enforce liquor laws in Ohio are being trained to fight more than illegal serving or drinking.

Gov. John Kasich says 80 undercover agents from the Ohio Investigative Unit, the agency that investigates liquor, tobacco and food stamp fraud, are being trained to spot the signs of human trafficking.

“If you have your eyes on what’s happening, you may prevent somebody from being taken and abused and have long term ramifications,” Kasich said.

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