Jo Ingles

Statehouse Reporter

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, WOSU Radio’s “All Sides with Ann Fisher” and other radio and television shows throughout the state. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service. She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo is also the media adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University, “Transcript” newspaper. She also teaches radio productions courses there. She lives in southern Delaware County with her husband, Roger, and two children.

Ways to Connect

photo of burning cigarette in hand
PHONRAT / SHUTTERSTOCK

The proposed budget coming out of the Ohio House doesn't include a 65-cents-per-pack tobacco tax proposed by Gov. John Kasich. The budget also omits plans for a uniform tax across all tobacco products. 

House Finance Chair Ryan Smith says one reason the taxes were scrapped is the fear that more Ohioans would go to Kentucky, Indiana or West Virginia, bordering states where cigarettes already cost less. But that doesn’t sit well with Jeff Stephens with the American Cancer Society’s Action Network.

Fair Districts Ohio logo
FAIR DISTRICTS

Two years after winning a reform of the way Statehouse lawmakers’ districts are drawn, advocates for congressional redistricting in Ohio have taken the first step to putting that issue before voters. 

The League of Women Voters, Common Cause Ohio and the Ohio Environmental Council have collected 1,000 petition signatures to ask voters to change the way Congressional district maps are drawn.

phot of Ohio Gov. John Kasich
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The part of Gov. John Kasich’s budget that would have required teachers to spend time shadowing business leaders in order to renew their licenses has been scrapped.

Kasich has been adamant about his plan, pushing it in his State of the State speech earlier this month.

“I want to make sure that our teachers, when they go for their re-license, that they spend a few days working in a business, learning about the work force needs of a community.”

photo of Ryan Smith
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

House Republicans have offered their own budget plan after seeing tax revenues come up short month after month. The changes include taking out nearly all of Gov. John Kasich’s tax reform proposals.

In his last two budgets Gov. John Kasich has proposed a plan that makes reductions to the income tax, saying he wants to shift the state away from relying on income taxes.

photo of Dennis Kucinich
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The fight over school funding in Ohio has been going on for nearly three decades. One former Ohio congressman and former state lawmaker says he is exploring the possibility of launching another lawsuit against the state for the way it funds for-profit charter schools.

Dennis Kucinich says his legal team is looking into the way the state funds for-profit charter schools with public money. And based on what they find, Kucinich says he might bring a lawsuit over it. But lawsuit or not, Kucinich says the system for funding those schools is corrupt.

Pages