Jo Ingles

Statehouse Reporter

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, WOSU Radio’s “All Sides with Ann Fisher” and other radio and television shows throughout the state. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service. She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo is also the media adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University, “Transcript” newspaper. She also teaches radio productions courses there. She lives in southern Delaware County with her husband, Roger, and two children.

Ways to Connect

photo of Bill O'Neill
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Some political analysts think one Republican lawmaker’s plan to remove the only Democratic Justice on the Ohio Supreme Court could backfire.

photo of Mary Taylor
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s Lieutenant Governor - who is running for the Republican nomination for governor next year - is pushing a plan to deal with opioids that some consider unusual, especially given her opposition to Medicaid expansion.

KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Both Republicans and Democrats are saying Tuesday’s vote gives them reasons to be hopeful about next year’s statewide election, which includes the race for governor. 

Ohio Democratic Party Chairman David Pepper says his party had big wins in mayor’s offices in 9 out of 10 large cities as well as success in traditionally red areas like Wilmington.

photo of Cathy Harper Lee
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Issue 1, the constitutional amendment that gives crime victims legal standing, was overwhelming approved by Ohio voters at the ballot box. It passed 83-17.

A surprising win, even for supporters
Dr. Henry Nicholas financed most of the Ohio campaign to pass Issue 1, known as Marsy’s Law. It’s named for his sister, who was killed by her boyfriend in 1983. Nicholas flew in from California to be with supporters of Marsy’s Law as the results came in on Election Night. And he seemed surprised at its overwhelming passage.

Ohio voting sticker
STATE OF OHIO

Ohioans will be going to the polls tomorrow to vote on victim’s rights, drug prices and many local candidates and issues. 

Issue 1 is the state constitutional amendment known as Marsy’s Law, which would put victims' rights in the Ohio constitution.

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