Jo Ingles

Statehouse Reporter

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, WOSU Radio’s “All Sides with Ann Fisher” and other radio and television shows throughout the state. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service. She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo is also the media adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University, “Transcript” newspaper. She also teaches radio productions courses there. She lives in southern Delaware County with her husband, Roger, and two children.

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Connie Pillich and Rich Cordray
Dan Konik / Statehouse News

The only woman who was still running for the Democratic nomination for governor has dropped out of the race. And as Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports, she’s throwing her support to a man she’d once criticized, but who many consider to be the front runner in the party’s primary.

A photo of Lisa Hamler Fugitt, Ohio Association of Foodbanks
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Under President Trump’s newly proposed budget, about 80 percent of SNAP recipients could lose about half of the credit that is currently put on their EBT cards. Instead, they'd get a box of processed food from the government.

The director of the organization that represents the state’s food banks says the change would destroy the safety net for low-income Ohioans and punish them instead.

Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program

Ohio’s auditor has found a big problem with the process for scoring applications from those interested in growing medical marijuana for the state’s new program. 

Auditor Dave Yost has sent a letter to the head of the Ohio Department of Commerce saying he’s concerned that employees could have changed scores for those who applied for large growers’ licenses because of the access given to two employees who created and managed passwords for the application reviewers.

Ian James
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Backers of a plan to put an all-out legalization of marijuana before voters this fall say they plan to introduce the issue in a couple of weeks.

Marijuana legalization spokesman Ian James says the group he represents is putting the final touches on proposed language for the petition to legalize marijuana in Ohio.

“To really kind of figure out the best possible, fair market, legalization language possible," James says.

photo of Ohio House
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

It’s highly likely Ohio voters will get to vote on a new way to draw Ohio’s Congressional disticts map in May. The House approved a plan Tuesday that passed the Senate unanimously the night before.  The passage comes in time for lawmakers to make the February 7th deadline for putting the issue before voters this spring.

House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger has nothing but praise for the new plan passed by lawmakers in his chamber.

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