Jo Ingles

Statehouse Reporter

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, WOSU Radio’s “All Sides with Ann Fisher” and other radio and television shows throughout the state. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service. She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo is also the media adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University, “Transcript” newspaper. She also teaches radio productions courses there. She lives in southern Delaware County with her husband, Roger, and two children.

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Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

Ohio’s top law enforcement official will serve as co-chair for a campaign to pass Issue 1, a proposed constitutional amendment for crime victims on the statewide ballot this fall. 

Attorney General Mike DeWine says some of the features of what’s being called “Marsy’s Law” are already in Ohio’s constitution. But he says it will give crime victims more power.

“It will enable a victim to enforce these rights, to go into court to say, 'You’re not following the constitution.”

senator charleta tavares at a podium
DAN KONIK / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

State lawmakers are once again considering changing regulations on cosmetologists, after eliminating a manager’s license last year. Now, there’s a bill that would reduce the amount of training needed to get a cosmetology license while focusing on developing apprenticeships instead. 

A state Senate Committee is considering a bill that’s meant to cut the number of classes needed for those who want to obtain a cosmetology license. Democratic Senator Charleta Tavares says the idea is to cut debt for students who attend cosmetology schools.

Karen Kasler

Gov. John Kasich has formally signed what’s become known as “Judy’s Law.” It's legislation named for a Columbus woman that imposes longer prison sentences on attackers who intentionally disfigure their victims by using accelerants to set them on fire.  As Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports, the law might not be the last to crack down on domestic violence.

 

Flanked by Judy Milinowski’s two young daughters, Kasich signed the bill, promising to take a look at existing domestic violence laws to see if they are comprehensive enough to protect women from abuse.

Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program logo
OHIO MEDICAL MARIJUANA CONTROL PROGRAM

It appears the state’s new medical marijuana program has cleared a hurdle. A public college has stepped forward to serve as the state’s medical marijuana testing laboratory. 

The medical marijuana law requires an Ohio public college or university to test cannabis for potency and quality before it goes to dispensaries for sale.

Picture of Ohio senate
Andy Chow

After joining the House in voting to override six of Gov. John Kasich’s budget vetoes last month, the state Senate was expected to come back this week to consider overriding more. But the Senate has cancelled the session. 

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