Jo Ingles

Statehouse Reporter

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, WOSU Radio’s “All Sides with Ann Fisher” and other radio and television shows throughout the state. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service. She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo is also the media adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University, “Transcript” newspaper. She also teaches radio productions courses there. She lives in southern Delaware County with her husband, Roger, and two children.

Ways to Connect

photo of Boomer Esiason
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

About 40,000 Ohio families with medically fragile children are battling to stop a change in the state program that helps them pay their kids’ bills. They got a boost in their fight from a well-known Ohio sports figure.

Ohio Department of Education logo
OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

The Class of 2018 in Ohio’s high schools will be the first to choose their route to graduation – pass some state tests, take a college entrance exam or earn an industry credential.

But new numbers show as much as a third of those students won’t be able to get their diplomas when those new graduation standards take effect next year. That has the state’s education leaders scrambling to make changes.

 

Lower than projected state tax revenue totals will make budgeting more difficult for Ohio’s lawmakers in the coming weeks. Advocates for the arts know the tight budget threatens their funding, and they are trying to make the case to save those dollars.

The executive director of the Ohio Citizens for the Arts, Bill Behrendt, says it’s important that state leaders give the Ohio Arts Council at least $34 million, a slight increase. He says it’s important to keep that funding – especially for smaller communities.

photo of Erik Farley
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

About two dozen Ohio Republicans who support President Trump's nomination of Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court took their message to the Statehouse on Thursday.

Columbus resident Erik Farley held a sign that read, “Gorsuch, Trump, Pence – Make America and SCOTUS great again.” Farley says Gorsuch is a fair jurist.

“When I heard him say he personally dislikes half of his rulings, I thought, 'There’s a guy who is doing the job,'" he says.

Kasich at the 2017 State of the State
YOUTUBE

Gov. John Kasich made a little news with his State of the State speech in Sandusky last night.
 

CLICK HERE for a complete text of Gov. John Kasich's speech.

Facing a huge and deadly opioid crisis that’s killing an average of eight people a day in Ohio, Kasich proposed some new money toward the battle from a fund dedicated to high tech.

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