Jo Ingles

Statehouse Reporter

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, WOSU Radio’s “All Sides with Ann Fisher” and other radio and television shows throughout the state. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service. She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo is also the media adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University, “Transcript” newspaper. She also teaches radio productions courses there. She lives in southern Delaware County with her husband, Roger, and two children.

Ways to Connect

photo of pension protesters
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Unions representing retired school employees are putting pressure om Ohio lawmakers not to freeze or cut cost-of-living allowances in their pensions.

About 200 members of the Ohio Association of Public School Employees marched at the Statehouse telling state lawmakers to keep their hands off pensions.

photo of Heartbeat Bill vigil
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A controversial abortion bill that Gov. Kasich vetoed at the end of last year has been reintroduced in the Ohio Legislature.

photo of judge gavel
ESB PROFESSIONAL / SHUTTERSTOCK

The so called Christmas tree bill that was quickly passed at the end of last year has found many of its ornaments broken by a court decision.

Ohio's Republican  lawmakers passed a bill in December that prevented cities from regulating pet stores and added some rules for animal care and sales. But it quickly morphed into what many referred to as the Christmas tree bill when lawmakers added provisions to prevent cities from enacting their own minimum wage laws and spelled out rules for where cell phone equipment can be placed.

Photo of Republican Senator Steve Wilson
Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

A bill to combat and prevent fraud against senior citizens is being considered by state lawmakers. 

Republican Sen. Steve Wilson says less than 5 percent of the fraud cases against senior citizens are reported. And he says people who might suspect seniors are being ripped off don’t often report it.

“Not only do we lose money from our seniors but we also lose money from our taxpayers because when this fraud is perpetrated, and when a Mrs. Jones loses her life savings, often times Mrs. Jones goes from being private pay within our care community to being on Medicaid.”

photo of Mike DeWine
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Attorney General Mike DeWine’s lawsuit against five drug companies is drawing mixed reactions from candidates for governor in 2018.

DeWine filed suit against the five drug companies, saying they deceived doctors and Ohioans about how addictive their painkillers are.

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