Jo Ingles

Statehouse Reporter

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, WOSU Radio’s “All Sides with Ann Fisher” and other radio and television shows throughout the state. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service. She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo is also the media adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University, “Transcript” newspaper. She also teaches radio productions courses there. She lives in southern Delaware County with her husband, Roger, and two children.

Ways to Connect

photo of Poor People's Campaign rally
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Fifty years ago, Martin Luther King Jr. advocated for Americans living in poverty in what was called the “Poor People’s Campaign.” Advocates for poor Ohioans todaysay the problems that existed are still common. So they're relaunching the effort.

Pastors and other advocates kicked off a 40-day campaign at the Statehouse. They sang songs, carried signs and listened to speakers. Pastor Thomas Barnes of the Kemper Road Church near Cincinnati says this is one of more than 30 events that he says will focus on non-violent activism.

Photo of marijuana
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Backers of a proposed constitutional amendment to make marijuana legal in Ohio have passed the first big hurdle in that process.

Ohio attorney general has approved a proposed amendment by the group, “Ohio Families for Change.” Spokesman Jonathan Varner says the premise is simple,  that marijuana should be treated and regulated the same or substantially the same as alcohol and tobacco.”

David Pepper
JO INGLES / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

Numbers from the Ohio Secretary of State’s office show the so-called blue wave, nicknamed for Democratic enthusiasm that’s been evident in other states' races recently, might not be real in Ohio. 

photo of Richard Cordray on primary election night 2018
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Former Ohio Attorney General and Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Chief Rich Cordray is the Democratic gubernatorial candidate after winning Tuesday’s primary. His victory was resounding.

With a large number of undetermined Democratic voters, many political pundits thought the race would be close. But Cordray won about two-thirds of the votes in a field of six candidates. He spent about $1.7 million and largely avoided the blistering campaign fight with his opponents that marked the Republican gubernatorial race between Attorney General Mike DeWine and Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor

Photo of people voting
DAN KONIK

Thousands of Ohioans are expected to go to the polls Tuesday to cast their ballots in the primary for governor, U.S. Senator, Congress and state lawmakers as well as a plan to change the redistricting process – and there are nearly 500 local levies and other issues on the ballot.

More than 128,000 Ohioans have already voted early. If you didn't, you’ll have to take care of business at your local precinct. You can find that location on the secretary of state’s website or by calling your local board of elections.

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