Jo Ingles

Statehouse Reporter

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, WOSU Radio’s “All Sides with Ann Fisher” and other radio and television shows throughout the state. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service. She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo is also the media adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University, “Transcript” newspaper. She also teaches radio productions courses there. She lives in southern Delaware County with her husband, Roger, and two children.

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Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

An Ohio Senate committee is set to consider a plan Tuesday devised by legislative leaders to change the way Ohio’s Congressional district map is drawn. Some key lawmakers have been behind closed doors trying to hammer out an agreement with minority Democrats to get enough of their buy-in to make passage viable.                        

Democrats are opposed to the plan offered by Republicans in the Senate, because they say it would still allow gerrymandering.

Statehouse News Bureau

One of the Democrats running for governor is calling for an end to oil and gas drilling in Ohio. While his four primary opponents aren’t embracing that idea, they agree that more needs to be done to protect the environment. 

Dennis Kucinich says he wants to use eminent domain to shut down fracking wells and initiate a class-action lawsuit to make fracking companies pay for damage to the environment.

“Those who have poisoned Ohio’s people and the land will be made to pay.”

Connie Pillich disagrees with Kucinich’s approach.

Nickie Antonio
ANDY CHOW / STATE OF OHIO

Two Republican state lawmakers have issued apologies for disparaging remarks they made earlier this week at a roast for a departing employee. But some lawmakers are demanding more than apologies. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports they want a change in the culture they say is prevalent in Ohio's statehouse.

The front page of the redistricting plan.
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

State lawmakers and some backers of a citizen-led initiative to change the way Ohio's Congressional map is drawn continue to hammer out an agreement on a new plan behind closed doors.

Republican Senate President Larry Obhof says he believes there’s hope that a deal can be reached on a plan that would be acceptable to lawmakers and to the citizens’ groups that want to put their redistricting plan on the November ballot.

Jo Ingles / Statehouse News

Sponsors of a bipartisan bill in the Ohio Legislature say they have a plan to lower the price of prescription drugs. But as Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports, it doesn’t do it the same way as the issue Ohio voters rejected in November. Instead, its aimed at the middlemen in the insurance process, pharmacy benefit managers.

Republican Rep. Scott Lipps says his bill doesn’t control drug prices, but it would stop pharmacy benefit managers from clawing back money from c0pays. And it would allow pharmacists to offer customers the cash price if it is lower than the copay.

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