Jo Ingles

Statehouse Reporter

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, WOSU Radio’s “All Sides with Ann Fisher” and other radio and television shows throughout the state. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service. She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo is also the media adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University, “Transcript” newspaper. She also teaches radio productions courses there. She lives in southern Delaware County with her husband, Roger, and two children.

Ways to Connect

photo of Mike DeWine
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio is suing five of the nation’s largest drug companies, blaming them for contributing to the state’s opioid crisis.

Attorney General Mike DeWine says five major drug companies have put profits over the safety of Ohioans.

photo of voting stickers
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Backers of a plan to allow Ohio voters to vote on congressional redistricting reform this fall have cleared one more hurdle. 

photo of US Supreme Court banner
U.S. Supreme Court

The fight over how Ohio has maintained its voter rolls has made it to the nation’s highest court.

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear the case involving the removal from Ohio's voter rolls people who haven’t cast a ballot for six years. Secretary of State Jon Husted is happy about that. 

“We think it’s great news because it’s going to give us a chance to validate that Ohio is following the rules for how you are supposed to maintain voter rolls.”

photo of empty desks
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A  bill in the state Legislature would give local school districts more control over curriculum.

The bill, sponsored by Republican Rep. Andy Thompson, would allow local school districts to eliminate the use of Common Core state standards and permit them to implement new standards instead. Thompson says the idea is to give local schools and teachers more control over their classrooms in the wake of many federal and state requirements.

Photo of Senators Rob Porman (left) and Sherrod Brown (right).
Karen Kasler / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s U.S. senators have introduced a bipartisan bill they say will help combat the opioid-abuse problems in the Buckeye State. 

Republican Sen. Rob Portman and Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown say their bill would raise the cap on beds covered by Medicaid at residential treatment facilities from 16 to 40. Brown says that means more Ohioans who need treatment for drug addiction can get it.

“We think that will help immensely. It will more than double the number of people who can be treated, in-patient, with beds.”

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