Jo Ingles

Statehouse Reporter

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, WOSU Radio’s “All Sides with Ann Fisher” and other radio and television shows throughout the state. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service. She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo is also the media adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University, “Transcript” newspaper. She also teaches radio productions courses there. She lives in southern Delaware County with her husband, Roger, and two children.

Ways to Connect

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

A new study paid for by financial planners, non-profits and state leaders shows most Ohioans are not saving enough for retirement.

Public Policy Polling did the survey, and spokesman Jim Williams says it shows less than half of Ohio adults have a financial plan for retirement.

photo of a hacker
Shutterstock.com / Shutterstock

Many large businesses have departments that deal with cybersecurity and data breaches on the internet, but smaller businesses often don’t have those resources. Those small operations are taking advantage of a program offered by the state. 

photo of Mary Taylor
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s lieutenant governor is stepping down from her job as the director of the state Department of Insurance.

Taylor has been the head of the Department of Insurance since Kasich took office in 2011. But Taylor is leaving that position effective immediately, and her deputy director, Jillian Froment, will take over.

photo of Gov. John Kasich
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. John Kasich is implementing rule changes limiting how medical professionals can prescribe opioids. This plan comes just one day after majority Republicans in the House announced a bill that would accomplish many of the same goals.

Kasich’s plan would enact rule changes to limit opioid prescriptions to a seven-day supply for an adult and a five-day supply for children. He’s adamant these changes are going into effect soon and don’t need legislative approval.

photo of Hackett, Edwards, Weidle and Householder
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio lawmakers are pushing a bill they think will reduce opioid overdose deaths by setting prescribing guidelines for doctors and dentists.

Every day in Ohio, eight people die from opioid overdoses, according to the latest data from the Ohio Department of Health. And each day, 84 infants are treated for drug withdrawal in Ohio hospitals. Some Republicans are hoping a bill they are sponsoring will lower those numbers.

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