Jo Ingles

Statehouse Reporter

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, WOSU Radio’s “All Sides with Ann Fisher” and other radio and television shows throughout the state. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service. She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo is also the media adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University, “Transcript” newspaper. She also teaches radio productions courses there. She lives in southern Delaware County with her husband, Roger, and two children.

Ways to Connect

photo of Attorney General Mike DeWine
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Attorney General Mike DeWine’s four month investigation into the activities of Planned Parenthood clinics in Ohio clears the organization of wrongdoing in one way but opens up questions about another practice. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports.

After the high profile videos that came out this summer that accused Planned Parenthood of selling fetal body parts, Attorney General Mike DeWine started an investigation into the organization’s three clinics statewide where abortions are performed.

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The Ohio House of Representatives

The Ohio House has passed a bill to help pets who need emergency medical care. 

Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles explains.

It’s rare that the House votes unanimously for anything, but lawmakers all agreed on this bill. Its sponsor, Republican Rep. Tim Ginter, says the legislation allows emergency medical personnel to provide treatment to animals.

Progressive Change Campaign Committee logo
Progressive Change Campaign Committee

Democrats around the country plan to talk a lot in the coming months about ways to make college more affordable.  Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports.

The Progressive Change Campaign Committee’s Kayla Wingbermuehle says many Democrats are backing a congressional plan to make college debt free by increasing federal aid to students and lowering higher education costs.

“It was the No. 1  issue that Democrats who didn’t vote last election cycle said would have motivated them to vote if political leaders had been talking about it.”

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The Ohio House of Representatives

Some Ohio cities already have police body cameras and others are considering getting them. 

As Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports, some state legislators want to make sure all cities have the same rules for using police body cameras.

Democratic Rep. Kevin Boyce says body cameras can be very helpful for police forces and as more around the state get that technology, he says a new bipartisan bill he’s co-sponsoring would make sure they have standards on how to use it.

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The Ohio Department of Youth Services

A federal judge has ended a decade of court-ordered oversight of Ohio's juvenile prison system. 

Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports.

In 2004, two child-advocacy lawyers sued the Department of Youth Services, claiming excessive use of force against children, inadequate education, denial of proper medical and mental health care and failure to adequately train and supervise staff.

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