Kabir Bhatia

Reporter

Kabir Bhatia joined WKSU as a Reporter/Producer and weekend host in 2010.  A graduate of Hudson High School, he received his Bachelor's from Kent State University.  While a Kent student, Bhatia served as a WKSU student assistant, working in the newsroom and for production.

Among his awards, he was named Best of Show – Best Reporter in Ohio for 2013 by the Ohio chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Ways to Connect

photo of Akron sewer project
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Construction is in full swing on the biggest piece of Akron’s $1.4 billion sewer project. A free tour allows people to see what’s happening beneath the city.

photo of shipping container
WKSU

The City of Youngstown could soon add a business incubator on its south side, made up entirely of shipping containers.

The project would convert the containers into small store fronts for entrepreneurs who may not be able to get financing to start a business, or who don’t have enough start-up capital to invest in a traditional building.

The city is studying the cost of the project as well as how to connect the containers to utilities.

photo of Ben Kellar, Noah Pengel, Destiny Reed
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

A generation ago, the battle to teach kids about drug abuse used scare tactics and the “Just Say No” campaign. In this installment of our series, Opioids: Turning the Tide in the Crisis, WKSU’s Kabir Bhatia reports that experts are now recommending a concentration on social and emotional learning, as well as peer-to-peer programs – some of which are already in-place in Northeast Ohio schools.

A new bill in the Ohio Senate would put limits on when motorists can run a red light -- meaning it would no longer apply to mosts motorists at all. 

H.B. 9 is a response to a law passed late last year, which would allow anyone to treat a red light like a stop sign if it appears to be malfunctioning, or doesn’t seem to be sensing the presence of a vehicle.

photo of Belle Everett, Drew Silverthorn
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

The past weekend saw several protests over the lack of town halls by Northeast Ohio Congressmen, including one in Canton at the office of Bob Gibbs.

About three-dozen people gathered Saturday in downtown Canton outside of Gibbs’ office, calling for him to meet with constituents in a public town hall. Karen Izzy Gallagher helped organize the rally, and says Gibbs’ request to meet with people in small groups in his office is not good enough.

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