Karen Kasler

Ohio Public Radio and TV Statehouse Bureau Chief

Karen is a lifelong Ohioan who has served as news director at WCBE-FM, assignment editor/overnight anchor at WBNS-TV, and afternoon drive anchor/assignment editor in WTAM-AM in Cleveland. In addition to her daily reporting for Ohio’s public radio stations, she’s reported for NPR, the BBC, ABC Radio News and other news outlets.  She hosts and produces the Statehouse News Bureau’s weekly TV show “The State of Ohio”, which airs on PBS stations statewide. She’s also a frequent guest on WOSU TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, a regular panelist on “The Sound of Ideas” on ideastream in Cleveland, appeared on the inaugural edition of “Face the State” on WBNS-TV and occasionally reports for “PBS Newshour”. She’s often called to moderate debates, including the Columbus Metropolitan Club’s Issue 3/legal marijuana debate and its pre-primary mayoral debate, and the City Club of Cleveland’s US Senate debate in 2012.

Karen is a graduate of Otterbein College, and earned her Master’s as a Fellow in the Kiplinger Program for Mid-Career Journalists at The Ohio State University. Karen has been honored by the Associated Press, the Association of Capitol Editors and Reporters, the Cleveland Press Club/Society of Professional Journalists, the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences/Ohio Valley Emmys, and holds a National Headliner Award. 

Ways to Connect

photo of John Carey
THE STATE OF OHIO

The state says it’s facing a looming crisis, and the solution is that more Ohioans need to graduate from college.

The state estimates that at the current rate of higher education achievement, by 2025 there will be almost two million Ohioans without the education or training they would need in the workforce.  So higher education Chancellor John Carey says the state wants 1.7 million more adults, or 65 percent of Ohioans to have college degrees or certificates in the next eight years.

The November election is more than three months away. But there’s a lot going with the issue that’s likely to be the most expensive ballot question in state history – a proposed law that would force the state to only buy drugs at a discounted price.

photo of Ohio State Fair
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

After years of big numbers, attendance at this year’s Ohio State Fair plummeted to its lowest number in 13 years.

In its 12-day run the fair brought in just over 801,000 – the lowest number since 2004 and a 13 percent drop from last year. 

Lisa Hamler Fugitt
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

There were a lot of cuts in this new state budget, largely because tax revenues were off nearly $850 million dollars for the last fiscal year. There’s one budget cut that’s small, but some worry it could have a huge impact on people who really need that money.

For 25 years, the state has offered temporary cash assistance to disabled Ohioans transitioning to federal social security disability. Those payments will be eliminated in the second year of this new budget.  

tax form
FLICKR

The new budget is just a month old, but several communities are said to be considering challenging it in court. They’re concerned about an option that is voluntary, but some say is unconstitutional.

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