Karen Kasler

Ohio Public Radio and TV Statehouse Bureau Chief

Karen is a lifelong Ohioan who has served as news director at WCBE-FM, assignment editor/overnight anchor at WBNS-TV, and afternoon drive anchor/assignment editor in WTAM-AM in Cleveland. In addition to her daily reporting for Ohio’s public radio stations, she’s reported for NPR, the BBC, ABC Radio News and other news outlets.  She hosts and produces the Statehouse News Bureau’s weekly TV show “The State of Ohio”, which airs on PBS stations statewide. She’s also a frequent guest on WOSU TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, a regular panelist on “The Sound of Ideas” on ideastream in Cleveland, appeared on the inaugural edition of “Face the State” on WBNS-TV and occasionally reports for “PBS Newshour”. She’s often called to moderate debates, including the Columbus Metropolitan Club’s Issue 3/legal marijuana debate and its pre-primary mayoral debate, and the City Club of Cleveland’s US Senate debate in 2012.

Karen is a graduate of Otterbein College, and earned her Master’s as a Fellow in the Kiplinger Program for Mid-Career Journalists at The Ohio State University. Karen has been honored by the Associated Press, the Association of Capitol Editors and Reporters, the Cleveland Press Club/Society of Professional Journalists, the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences/Ohio Valley Emmys, and holds a National Headliner Award. 

Ways to Connect

photo of Mike DeWine
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Republican candidate for governor has released what he says is a plan to invest in Ohio’s kids, families and future. But Democrats are saying his record says otherwise.

“This is what I’m passionate about. This is what I believe matters most for the future of our state. And it’s why I’m running for governor.”

photo of logo of Ohio Council of Behavioral Health and Family Services Providers
Ohio Council of Behavioral Health and Family Services Providers

On Sunday, the state will officially move providers of behavioral health services for low-income Ohioans into Medicaid managed care. That’s a huge change for how they get paid for providing addiction and mental illness treatment, family counseling and other services. These last few days are causing lots of worry for some of those providers.

The state’s Office of Health Transformation says rapid response teams have been set up to help providers who are having trouble with the managed-care plans that will pay claims.

photo of the U.S. Supreme Court
WIKIMEDIA

A split U.S. Supreme Court has ruled against Ohio in a case involving rules that American Express requires merchants who accept its credit cards to follow.

Photo of Huffman proposing changes
KAREN KASLER / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

A national group that says Ohio’s payday lending rates are the highest in the nation came out strongly against possible changes to a bill that would crack down on the industry. Lawmakers are suggesting a vote on the bill could come this week.

School desks
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The House has overwhelmingly passed a bill to adopt a model curriculum for schools to use to teach cursive handwriting to elementary school kids.

Democratic Rep. Dan Ramos argued against the idea, saying he flunked handwriting in second grade, that his 20-something staff never uses cursive, and that he would rather see the class time used for computer coding or a foreign language – something for the future rather than of the past.

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