Lydia Taylor

News Intern

Lydia Taylor is a news intern for WKSU. She is a senior multimedia journalism major at Kent State University with experience in print and visual journalism. She is currently working towards a Bachelor’s Degree in Multimedia Journalism.  During the school year, Taylor works for Kent State Student Media in The Kent Stater and KentWired. She is currently the editor-in-chief in the Kent State University Student Media Newsroom for the fall semester. 

Ways to Connect

An Akron non-profit has been awarded a $75,000 United Way of Summit County Bold Goals grant to help prepare students for the future.

Jobs for Ohio Graduates plans to use the grant to assist Bold Goal number 2, which aims at 90 percent of Akron public high school students to have a 60 percent college and career readiness rate by 2025.

Executive Director Chris Canova says the grant provides room for growth and opportunity.

Ohio has partnered with two other states and the province of Ontario to develop a plan to block species of Asian carp from getting into the Great Lakes.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is proposing new barriers in the Chicago waterway, which connects to the lakes that include a lock and dam.

Missile defense system
U.S. Defense Department

Ohio lawmakers are presenting a united front in efforts to get a missile defense base located at Camp Ravenna.

The Ohio House unanimously passed a Senate resolution, which calls on the U.S. Defense Department to place the base in Northeast Ohio.

Ohio Senator John Eklund’s district includes Camp Ravenna.

DAN HORRIGAN
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

Akron has released its spending plan for the additional money for public safety and roads raised from an income-tax increase approved by voters last year.

The increase is expected to raise $13 million this year. 

Mayor Dan Horrigan says the priorities include replacing one fire station, designing the replacement for another and repaving an additional 37 miles of road.

beech tree nut
VIVIAN GOODMAN / WKSU

Researchers say they are stumped by a disease that’s infecting beech trees in Northeast Ohio.

Beech leaf disease can be identified by curling leaves with dark stripes. The leaves fall earlier than normal and prevents the tree from blooming the next season.

Mike Watson, conservation biologist at Holden Arboretum, says the cause of the disease and how it spreads is unknown.

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