Mark Arehart

Arts Reporter/Host

Mark Arehart joined the award-winning WKSU news team as its arts/culture reporter in 2017. Before coming to Northeast Ohio, Arehart hosted Morning Edition and covered the arts scene for Delaware Public Media. He previously worked for KNKX in Seattle, Kansas Public Radio, and KYUK in Bethel, Alaska.  

His reporting has taken him everywhere from remote islands in the Bering Sea to the tops of skyscrapers overlooking Puget Sound. Arehart has been featured on NPR and the Alaska Public Radio Network. 

Equal parts Nebraskan/Kansan and a University of Kansas graduate, he's a diehard college basketball fan. He loves reading crime fiction and fantasy, as well as enjoying movies with subtitles, explosions, or both. 

He lives in Akron's Highland Square neighborhood and as a former morning drive-time host, you'll likely find him out walking his dog, Otis, well before sunrise.

Feel free to tweet at him, find him on Instagram, or send him an email. 

pocket park on North High Street in Akron
Mark Arehart / WKSU

A new temporary pop-up park in Akron is now open for visitors. It's part of an effort to get more people to the north side of Akron’s downtown. 

photo of Rolling Acres Mall
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, July 17:

  • Akron issues warrants for three shooting suspects;
  • Rolling Acres Mall property sells for $600,000;
  • Ben Carson to visit Family Promise of Greater Cleveland;
  • Former Cuyahoga County Auditor seeks reduced sentence;
  • Belmont County Republican Party Chairman resigns;
  • Gov. John Kasich to dedicate wildlife area to Olympian Jesse Owens;

Akron issues warrants for three shooting suspects

Mark Arehart / WKSU

The FRONT International Triennial, an extended series of art installations across the region, launched over the weekend.

SHUTTERSHOCK

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, July 16:

  • Summit County unveils Fentanyl testing strips;
  • Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh donated to Richard Cordray;
  • Ohio approves legislation to honor Charles Follis;
  • Ohio State University president Michael Drake in top 10 highest paid among university presidents;
  • Akron kicks off Soap Box Derby;
  • Cleveland Cavaliers to re-sign Channing Frye;

Summit County unveils Fentanyl testing strips

Collection of the artist. Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo/Singapore; Victoria Miro, London; David Zwirner, New York. © Yayoi Kusama

It took more than 50 years for Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama to finally get the recognition her male counterparts gained in the 1960s. Now people in Northeast Ohio can take in her work for themselves. On this week’s State of the Arts, WKSU’s Mark Arehart goes to the Cleveland Museum of Art and steps into Yayoi Kusama's "Infinity Mirrors.”

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