Mark Arehart

Arts Reporter/Host

Mark Arehart joined the award-winning WKSU news team as its arts/culture reporter in 2017. Before coming to Northeast Ohio, Arehart hosted Morning Edition and covered the arts scene for Delaware Public Media. He previously worked for KNKX in Seattle, Kansas Public Radio, and KYUK in Bethel, Alaska.  

His reporting has taken him everywhere from remote islands in the Bering Sea to the tops of skyscrapers overlooking Puget Sound. Arehart has been featured on NPR and the Alaska Public Radio Network. 

Equal parts Nebraskan/Kansan and a University of Kansas graduate, he's a diehard college basketball fan. He loves reading crime fiction and fantasy, as well as enjoying movies with subtitles, explosions, or both. 

He lives in Akron's Highland Square neighborhood and as a former morning drive-time host, you'll likely find him out walking his dog, Otis, well before sunrise.

Feel free to tweet at him, find him on Instagram, or send him an email. 

photo of Kenmore, Ohio mural submission

A new coloring book features public spaces in one Akron neighborhood. It’s a mural project called the Kenmore Imagineer and residents hope it will add a splash of color to Kenmore Boulevard.

Canton Museum of Art

The Canton Museum of Art did not know exactly what it would get when it put out a call for artists to mail in small pieces of artwork. The museum ended up with far more than it expected: at least 220 submissions. 

Mark Arehart / WKSU

An Akron theater company is telling the story of a family that’s been torn apart by addiction and put back together after years of struggle, only to find itself on the brink once again. "Daybreak's Children" looks at the opioid crisis through one family’s front window.

photo of future home of Sernite

The team behind Edwins, the restaurant in Cleveland that gives ex-offenders food service training, is expanding its model to Medina.

Mark Arehart / WKSU

It’s been a century since acclaimed French sculptor Auguste Rodin died. Museums around the world have a casting of his iconic work The Thinker, but the one at the Cleveland Museum of Art stands apart because of an act of violence that happened nearly 50 years after its creator's death.