Mark Arehart

Arts Reporter/Host

Mark Arehart joined the award-winning WKSU news team as its arts/culture reporter in 2017. Before coming to Northeast Ohio, Arehart hosted Morning Edition and covered the arts scene for Delaware Public Media. He previously worked for KNKX in Seattle, Kansas Public Radio, and KYUK in Bethel, Alaska.  

His reporting has taken him everywhere from remote islands in the Bering Sea to the tops of skyscrapers overlooking Puget Sound. Arehart has been featured on NPR and the Alaska Public Radio Network. 

Equal parts Nebraskan/Kansan and a University of Kansas graduate, he's a diehard college basketball fan. He loves reading crime fiction and fantasy, as well as enjoying movies with subtitles, explosions, or both. 

He lives in Akron's Highland Square neighborhood and as a former morning drive-time host, you'll likely find him out walking his dog, Otis, well before sunrise.

Feel free to tweet at him, find him on Instagram, or send him an email. 

Self-Portrait/Photogravure , 2005
Courtesy / Akron Art Museum

Following accusations of sexual harassment against artist Chuck Close, are museums in Northeast Ohio reconsidering how they exhibit his work?

Chief Wahoo logo

After years of controversy, the Cleveland Indians are phasing out Chief Wahoo. The team and Major League Baseball have announced the logo will be removed rom team uniforms after this season.

The change follows a longstanding debate about whether Chief Wahoo is appropriate for a team symbol.

WKSU sports commentator Terry Pluto says Major League Baseball and Indians owner Paul Dolan agreed to nix the logo of a grinning caricature of a Native American man that many find offensive. But the change isn't a ban

Davis Besse

Correction:  This article originally included a story referencing the executive director of the Greater Cleveland RTA.  The person in the story is actually executive director of Akron Metro RTA.

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, Jan. 26:

Google Earth

Earlier this week, the Trump administration announced increased tariffs on imported washing machines. U.S. Sens. Rob Portman, a Republican, and Sherrod Brown, a Democrat, strongly support the move, saying it’s good for Ohio manufacturing.

Pipeline sections

Correction: There's no evidence that nearly 150,000 gallons of drilling fluid Rover pipeline builders lost down a hole beneath the Tuscarawas River entered wetlands. No one has yet established where it went. Energy Transfer Partners maintains, "We are continuing to work through the process, and we are working in coordination with FERC on all of the remaining HDDs and are in compliance with the HDD contingency plan that was approved by FERC."

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, Jan. 22: