Mitch Felan

News Intern

Mitch Felan is a multimedia journalist with experience in radio, television, print and visual journalism. He is back with the WKSU team after spending a semester studying in Washington D.C. Outside of work, he enjoys making music, watching movies and bike riding. He plans to graduate from Kent State University with a Bachelor's Degree in Multimedia Journalism this fall.

 

Ways to Connect

Photo of bobcat
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Animal advocates are applauding the state’s decision to postpone a proposed trapping season for bobcats. The state Wildlife Council voted 6-1 Thursday to put the proposal on an indefinite hold.

Corey Roscoe with the U.S. Humane Society applauds the decision. She says the science does not back up harvesting bobcats.

Union Metal streetlights
UNION METAL

Canton’s Union Metal will reopen with a new owner after its acquisition by a New York-based investment firm. 

In December, the parent company announced it would shut down operations, leading to the layoffs of more than 300 workers.

Police headquarters, Akron, Ohio
Tim Rudell / WKSU

Community leaders have launched a new fund to help Summit County police and firefighters work closer with their communities.

The Akron Community Foundation has kicked off the Summit County Police and Fire Community Engagement Fund with a $10,000 donation from the John A. McAlonan Fund.

photo of East CLC
EAST CLC

Akron Public Schools is going to benefit from a half million-dollar grant to better focus educational and support services for its students.

Key Bank is giving the grant to United Way of Summit County to coordinate the programs for the East Community Learning Center and the schools that feed into it. These include providing wraparound services for non-academic issues at elementary schools and creating a new financial technology learning lab at East CLC.

photo of dog
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

A new report finds the veterinary industry directly contributes $2.4 billion to Ohio’s economy and contributes as much as $13 billion when indirect costs are added.

The findings by the Ohio Veterinary Medicine Association also show vet service jobs increased 15.5 percent from 2007-2015. The association’s executive director, Jack Advent, says the numbers prove that vets help more than cats and dogs in the state.

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