M.L. Schultze

Digital editor, reporter/producer

M.L. Schultze came to WKSU as news director in July 2007 after 25 years at The Repository in Canton, where she was managing editor for nearly a decade. She’s now the digital editor and an award-winning reporter and analyst who has appeared on NPR, Here and Now, the TakeAway, and C-SPAN as well as being a regular panelist on Ideas, WVIZ public television's reporter roundtable.

Schultze was part of a local/national reporting team with NPR covering the 2016 elections. Her work includes ongoing reporting on community-police relations; immigration; fracking and extensive state, local and national political coverage. She’s also past president of Ohio Associated Press Media Editors and the Akron Press Club, and remains on the board of both.

A native of Philadelphia, Pa., Schultze graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in magazine journalism and political science. She lives in Canton with her husband, Rick Senften, the retired special projects editor at The Rep and now a specialist working with kids involved in the juvenile courts. Their daughter, Gwen, lives and works in the Washington, D.C.-area with her husband and two sons. Son Christopher, is a glassblower living and working in Stark County.

Dave Joyce's tweet
Twitter

Editor's Note: This story has been updated to include Rep. Jim Renacci's decision to support the GOP bill.

Northeast Ohio Congressman Dave Joyce has come out opposed to the Republican replacement for the Affordable Care Act.

Other Ohio Republicans who have refused to back the bill so far have been from the most conservative wing of the party. But Joyce is considered a moderate – a faction that's largely been mum.

Sherrod Brown file photo
WKSU FILE PHOTO

Democratic senators, including Ohio’s Sherrod Brown, are threatening to filibuster the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Brown says his objections to Gorsuch are over a series of decisions supported by the Colorado judge that Brown maintains put corporate rights ahead of human rights.

“The last four justices have all been able to get more than 60 votes because they’ve not been so objectionable. They’ve not been considered so much to be in abeyance to the corporate interests in this country. That’s troubling to a lot of us.”

Keith Hochade
YOUTUBE

One of the state’s most active addiction-treatment programs is expanding its services for women’s and outreach. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze spoke with the head of the Stark County nonprofit CommQuest about the half-million-dollar effort.

CommQuest provided detox, residential treatment and outpatient services to close to 6,000 people last year. That includes housing, counseling and treatment at Deliverance House, a 90-day women’s residential program in Canton. It often has a waiting list of more than a month.

The former U.S. ambassador to Singapore, Frank Lavin, has published a new book about a Canton G.I. coming to grips with the violence and vagaries of World War II. It’s his dad’s story, crafted from old letters, memories and research – but Lavin says it’s actually a story shared by millions of kids who came of age during war. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze spoke with Lavin about the book, “Home Front to Battlefront, An Ohio Teenager in World War II.”

Family photo of Tamir Rice
Family of Tamir Rice

A new study introduced with the Cleveland police shooting of 12-year-old Tamir Rice finds that people perceive young black men as larger and more threatening than similarly sized white men.  

 

The study published by the American Psychological Association asked nearly a thousand online participants to compare color photographs of young white and black men of equal height and weight. John Paul Wilson, a professor at Montclair State University in New Jersey says, consistently, participants believed the black men were stronger, more muscular and more menacing.

 

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