M.L. Schultze

Digital editor, reporter/producer

M.L. Schultze came to WKSU as news director in July 2007 after 25 years at The Repository in Canton, where she was managing editor for nearly a decade. She’s now the digital editor and an award-winning reporter and analyst who has appeared on NPR, Here and Now, the TakeAway, and C-SPAN as well as being a regular panelist on Ideas, WVIZ public television's reporter roundtable.

Schultze was part of a local/national reporting team with NPR covering the 2016 elections and was named the best radio reporter in Ohio this year by the Society of Professional Journalists. Her work includes ongoing reporting on community-police relations; immigration; fracking and extensive state, local and national political coverage. She’s also past president of Ohio Associated Press Media Editors and the Akron Press Club, and remains on the board of both.

A native of Philadelphia, Pa., Schultze graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in magazine journalism and political science. She lives in Canton with her husband, Rick Senften, the retired special projects editor at The Rep and now a specialist working with kids involved in the juvenile courts. Their daughter, Gwen, lives and works in the Washington, D.C.-area with her husband and two sons. Son Christopher is a glassblower and welder living and working in Stark County.

Photo of Peggy and Diane Mang
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

Nearly 60 years ago, mental-health treatment began its move from massive warehouses like the old Massillon State Hospital to community-based care. But the path to effective treatment continues to face challenges: from old stereotypes to new medications. In the third installment of our series, “Navigating the Path to Mental Health,” WKSU’s M.L. Schultze explores the evolution among providers, advocates and patients.

photo of early voters in Stark County
WKSU

In a close vote, the U.S.  Supreme Court has upheld Ohio’s purge of its voting rolls, saying the state can remove voters after they fail to cast ballots for two years and don’t respond to notices for another four.  The
Supreme Court vote was 5 to 4.

Among the plaintiffs was Larry Harmon, a Navy vet who lives near Kent. He skipped voting after the 2008 election in part because he wasn’t enthused about the candidates and in part because of disruption in his personal life.

Photo of Kabell presentation
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

Akron is trying to figure out how to become a bike-friendly city. As WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports, that means taking on the challenges of weather, hills and -- most-daunting-of-all -- drivers.

photo of Sherrod Brown with Teamsters
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Tax cuts and immigration – two issues that promise to define Ohio’s U.S. Senate race -- moved to center stage this week. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze talked with the Democratic incumbent Sherrod Brown about the issues.

Photo of Akron ride
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

Akron is holding three days of events this week to try to figure out what it will take to make the city more bike friendly. 

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