M.L. Schultze

Digital editor, reporter/producer

M.L. Schultze came to WKSU as news director in July 2007 after 25 years at The Repository in Canton, where she was managing editor for nearly a decade. She’s now the digital editor and an award-winning reporter and analyst who has appeared on NPR, Here and Now, the TakeAway, and C-SPAN as well as being a regular panelist on Ideas, WVIZ public television's reporter roundtable.

Schultze was part of a local/national reporting team with NPR covering the 2016 elections. Her work includes ongoing reporting on community-police relations; immigration; fracking and extensive state, local and national political coverage. She’s also past president of Ohio Associated Press Media Editors and the Akron Press Club, and remains on the board of both.

A native of Philadelphia, Pa., Schultze graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in magazine journalism and political science. She lives in Canton with her husband, Rick Senften, the retired special projects editor at The Rep and now a specialist working with kids involved in the juvenile courts. Their daughter, Gwen, lives and works in the Washington, D.C.-area with her husband and two sons. Son Christopher, is a glassblower living and working in Stark County.

Keith Hochadel
YOUTUBE

Canton-based CommQuest has opened the first medication-assisted treatment clinic in one of the areas of the state hit hardest by the opioid crisis.  Schultze has more.

The clinic opened in the East Liverpool last week. It offers Suboxone -- doses that give addicts enough medication to ease them through withdrawal but not enough to get high.

PAIN MANAGEMENT AND THE OPIOD CRISIS / National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine

A major new study on the opioid epidemic that has swept through Ohio and much of the rest of the country says the painkillers that triggered the crisis likely never should have been prescribed for many chronic pains.  

David Clark directs a Veterans Affairs Pain Clinic in California and is one of the 18 researchers who participated  the study for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. He says opioids are undeniably beneficial for advanced stages of cancer, severe injuries and for end-of-life treatments:

Sen. Sherrod Brown
WKSU, Brown at the DNC

All Republican senators have been called to a meeting tomorrow to talk about the GOP’s newest plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act. But some are also meeting with Democrats about an alternative. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports that Democratic Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown says he’d be willing to be part of such talks

Canal Park
AKRON RUBBERDUCKS

The baseball world was focused on the All-Star game last night. Five Cleveland Indians were on the AL squad. But our sports commentator, Terry Pluto, says this is also a good time of year to look for the players who could be tomorrow’s greats, and there’s no better place to look than Akron...

Mary Taylor
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor’s official announcement last week that she’s running for governor rounds out the GOP field at four. More than the others, though, Taylor is walking a line, praising the progress of Ohio under Gov. John Kasich, while drawing distinctions. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze has more on what may be shaping up to be a proxy primary battle between Kasich and President Donald Trump

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