M.L. Schultze

Digital editor, reporter/producer

M.L. Schultze came to WKSU as news director in July 2007 after 25 years at The Repository in Canton, where she was managing editor for nearly a decade. She’s now the digital editor and an award-winning reporter and analyst who has appeared on NPR, Here and Now, the TakeAway, and C-SPAN as well as being a regular panelist on Ideas, WVIZ public television's reporter roundtable.

Schultze was part of a local/national reporting team with NPR covering the 2016 elections and was named the best radio reporter in Ohio this year by the Society of Professional Journalists. Her work includes ongoing reporting on community-police relations; immigration; fracking and extensive state, local and national political coverage. She’s also past president of Ohio Associated Press Media Editors and the Akron Press Club, and remains on the board of both.

A native of Philadelphia, Pa., Schultze graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in magazine journalism and political science. She lives in Canton with her husband, Rick Senften, the retired special projects editor at The Rep and now a specialist working with kids involved in the juvenile courts. Their daughter, Gwen, lives and works in the Washington, D.C.-area with her husband and two sons. Son Christopher is a glassblower and welder living and working in Stark County.

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RICK SENFTEN / WKSU public radio

One of Northeast Ohio’s four sanctuary churches held an interfaith prayer service this weekend marking Father’s Day and protesting the splitting of families that is increasingly part of national immigration policy.  WKSU’s M.L. Schultze spoke with the pastor of Cleveland’s Pilgrim Congregational United Church of Christ about the evolution of the movement.

The Rev. Kelly Burd and about 75 others gathered outside the imposing stone church on Cleveland’s west side, praying for guidance, faith and courage.

M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

Akron City Council is not likely to decide until this fall what to do about a tent city of homeless people on the city’s east side. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports on a struggle by city planners and others to find an answer:

Advocates for Second Chance Village cheered and elebrated the announcement that the Akron Planning Commission would delay a vote on the tent city’s future until next month.

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WKSU

President Trump is likely to have a big impact on Ohio’s U.S. Senate race this fall  – for better and worse. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze has more on some of the indicators in the latest Quinnipiac poll.

Five months before the election, the poll shows incumbent Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown well ahead of his Republican challenger, Congressman Jim Renacci (51-34 percent).

And it shows the top issues in the Senate race are:

Rob Portman, U.S. Senator from Ohio
WKSU

U.S. Sen. Rob Portman says he’s been pushing the Trump administration to issue more temporary work visas to fill jobs in Ohio. He also says he opposes immigration agents separating parents from their young children.

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M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

Nearly 60 years ago, mental-health treatment began its move from massive warehouses like the old Massillon State Hospital to community-based care. But the path to effective treatment continues to face challenges: from old stereotypes to new medications. In the third installment of our series, “Navigating the Path to Mental Health,” WKSU’s M.L. Schultze explores the evolution among providers, advocates and patients.

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