M.L. Schultze

Digital editor, reporter/producer

M.L. Schultze came to WKSU as news director in July 2007 after 25 years at The Repository in Canton, where she was managing editor for nearly a decade. She’s now the digital editor and an award-winning reporter and analyst who has appeared on NPR, Here and Now, the TakeAway, and C-SPAN as well as being a regular panelist on Ideas, WVIZ public television's reporter roundtable.

Schultze was part of a local/national reporting team with NPR covering the 2016 elections. Her work includes ongoing reporting on community-police relations; immigration; fracking and extensive state, local and national political coverage. She’s also past president of Ohio Associated Press Media Editors and the Akron Press Club, and remains on the board of both.

A native of Philadelphia, Pa., Schultze graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in magazine journalism and political science. She lives in Canton with her husband, Rick Senften, the retired special projects editor at The Rep and now a specialist working with kids involved in the juvenile courts. Their daughter, Gwen, lives and works in the Washington, D.C.-area with her husband and two sons. Son Christopher, is a glassblower living and working in Stark County.

SHERROD BROWN
FILE PHOTO

Ohio’s Democratic U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown says he remains hopeful he and President Trump can work together to renegotiate trade agreements. He says he and Trump have talked by phone about “Buy American” priorities, and he’s had repeated meetings with Trump’s economic and trade representatives to discuss revisions to the North American Free Trade Agreement.

ROB PORTMAN
SCREEN CAPTURE

Ohio Sen. Rob Portman acknowledges he was unsettled by President Donald Trump’s Tweet today calling for a “good” government shutdown. But, as WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports, Portman says he’s trying to focus on the policies, not what he calls “the noise.”

Portman says he generally agrees with Arizona Sen. John McCain, who suggested people should be watching what the Trump administration does rather than what it says – or what President Trump tweets.

Poster on the wall
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

For some, the fight against the opioid epidemic is a national priority. For others, it’s a personal struggle.  WKSU’s M.L. Schultze takes us to a basement room in Massillon, where, for about an hour last week, the story of broad policy and personal battles intertwined.

JOHN ALLER
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Ohio is getting $26 million from the federal government to help fight the opioid epidemic. 

The CURES Act passed in the waning days of the Obama administration and promised a billion dollars over two years to improve monitoring, prevention and treatment. This week, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced the first round of $485 million in grants to states.

Gibbs Portman at table
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Ohio Sen. Rob Portman and Congressman Bob Gibbs toured a residential center in Massillon today that treats people addicted to opioids. They also heard arguments that the Medicaid expansion that many fellow Republicans oppose is crucial to such efforts. 

The tour was of two 100-year-old buildings on what used to be the grounds of Massillon State psychiatric hospital. They’ve been renovated and turned over to CommQuest services to provide detox, medication maintenance and residential treatment.

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