M.L. Schultze

Digital editor, reporter/producer

M.L. Schultze came to WKSU as news director in July 2007 after 25 years at The Repository in Canton, where she was managing editor for nearly a decade. She’s now the digital editor and an award-winning reporter and analyst who has appeared on NPR, Here and Now, the TakeAway, and C-SPAN as well as being a regular panelist on Ideas, WVIZ public television's reporter roundtable.

Schultze was part of a local/national reporting team with NPR covering the 2016 elections and was named the best radio reporter in Ohio this year by the Society of Professional Journalists. Her work includes ongoing reporting on community-police relations; immigration; fracking and extensive state, local and national political coverage. She’s also past president of Ohio Associated Press Media Editors and the Akron Press Club, and remains on the board of both.

A native of Philadelphia, Pa., Schultze graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in magazine journalism and political science. She lives in Canton with her husband, Rick Senften, the retired special projects editor at The Rep and now a specialist working with kids involved in the juvenile courts. Their daughter, Gwen, lives and works in the Washington, D.C.-area with her husband and two sons. Son Christopher is a glassblower and welder living and working in Stark County.

photo of algae bloom in Maumee Bay State Park
ELIZABETH MILLER / GREAT LAKES TODAY

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, March 22:

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FDA

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, March 21:

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STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, March 20:

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ANDREW MEYER / WKSU

The Republican running for Ohio Secretary of State says the passion of both parties over voting issues may be doing damage to American’s confidence in their democracy. Frank Larose, the state senator who hopes to succeed Secretary of State Jon Husted, told the Akron Press Club today any move that disenfranchises any voters or allows any voter fraud is too much.

“But nobody should overstate the existence of either fraud or suppression because I think what it does is underminds the confidence that voters have.” 

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STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, March 16:

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