M.L. Schultze

Digital editor, reporter/producer

M.L. Schultze came to WKSU as news director in July 2007 after 25 years at The Repository in Canton, where she was managing editor for nearly a decade. She’s now the digital editor and an award-winning reporter and analyst who has appeared on NPR, Here and Now, the TakeAway, and C-SPAN as well as being a regular panelist on Ideas, WVIZ public television's reporter roundtable.

Schultze was part of a local/national reporting team with NPR covering the 2016 elections and was named the best radio reporter in Ohio this year by the Society of Professional Journalists. Her work includes ongoing reporting on community-police relations; immigration; fracking and extensive state, local and national political coverage. She’s also past president of Ohio Associated Press Media Editors and the Akron Press Club, and remains on the board of both.

A native of Philadelphia, Pa., Schultze graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in magazine journalism and political science. She lives in Canton with her husband, Rick Senften, the retired special projects editor at The Rep and now a specialist working with kids involved in the juvenile courts. Their daughter, Gwen, lives and works in the Washington, D.C.-area with her husband and two sons. Son Christopher is a glassblower living and working in Stark County.

Photo of tribute to Tamir Rice
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

A Cleveland grand jury has decided against indicting two police officers in the November 2014 shooting death of 12-year-old Tamir Rice.

Prosecutor Tim McGinty says a "perfect storm of human error" led to the death of Tamir Rice, who was holding what turned out to be a toy pellet gun when he was shot by police within two seconds of their arriving.

"The death of Tamir Rice was an absolute tragedy. It was horrible, unfortunate and regrettable. But it was not, by the law that binds us, a crime."

Dan Horrigan
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

 

 

   This Friday, Dan Horrigan officially becomes Akron’s first new elected mayor in nearly three decades. He’s already appointed most of his cabinet as well as a Blue Ribbon Commission to give him an overview of how the city operates. But as WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports, Horrigan says one of the most important advantages he has is a balance of fresh perspective and continuity.

Chairs marking deaths
STATE OF OHIO

Ohio’s traffic deaths are up nearly 10 percent over this time last year, and the state is trying to curb the numbers heading into the holiday-driving season. 

  The  Ohio Highway Patrol and Ohio Department of Transportation planted 1,070 chairs on the department’s Columbus lawn today to commemorate those who have died. 

Patrol Superintendent Col. Paul Pride says he and his officers a have had to notify too many families of such deaths.

 

Dan Horrigan
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

 

Akron has been rated the best city in the nation when it comes to return-on-investment on spending for police. 

The calculations of the personal finance site WalletHub compare tax dollars spent per capita for police protection to crime rates, with adjustments made for poverty and unemployment rates and household income.

Planned Parenthood is suing Ohio, claiming it reinterpreted a fetal tissue disposal rule without notifying anyone and specifically to target Planned Parenthood.

The organization says in a federal lawsuit filed today that the Ohio Department of Health denied it equal protection and due process, according to Associated Press.

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