M.L. Schultze

Digital editor, reporter/producer

M.L. Schultze came to WKSU as news director in July 2007 after 25 years at The Repository in Canton, where she was managing editor for nearly a decade. She’s now the digital editor and an award-winning reporter and analyst who has appeared on NPR, Here and Now, the TakeAway, and C-SPAN as well as being a regular panelist on Ideas, WVIZ public television's reporter roundtable.

Schultze was part of a local/national reporting team with NPR covering the 2016 elections and was named the best radio reporter in Ohio this year by the Society of Professional Journalists. Her work includes ongoing reporting on community-police relations; immigration; fracking and extensive state, local and national political coverage. She’s also past president of Ohio Associated Press Media Editors and the Akron Press Club, and remains on the board of both.

A native of Philadelphia, Pa., Schultze graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in magazine journalism and political science. She lives in Canton with her husband, Rick Senften, the retired special projects editor at The Rep and now a specialist working with kids involved in the juvenile courts. Their daughter, Gwen, lives and works in the Washington, D.C.-area with her husband and two sons. Son Christopher is a glassblower and welder living and working in Stark County.

Rendering of Ritzman's entry
Ritzman Pharmacies

  The U.S. market for prescription drugs is about $260 billion a year. Three-quarters of the prescriptions are for chronic conditions – and that’s likely to expand as baby boomers get older. This week in our series, The Business of Health, WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports, the question is not if the business of pharmacy will grow, but in which direction. And Northeast Ohio is trying out some new versions of old models.

Passing out ballots
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

This is the place where they choose the people who wear the crazy hats on the convention floor, get wildly passionate about an event others dismiss as political theater – and who – paraphrasing vaudevillian W.C. Fields --  would rather be in Philadelphia ...  even in July.

David Pepper
FILE PHOTO

Ohio Democrats are hoping for thousands of people to show up in all 16 of the state’s congressional districts tomorrow night. As WKSU’s M.L. Schultze report, they’ll be picking delegates to the Democratic presidential convention this summer.

In all, more than 500 people are running for what comes down to a trip to Philadelphia in July – and a chance to declare whether they want Bernie Sanders or Hillary Clinton to be president.

Ohio Democratic Party Chairman David Pepper says those candidates include some new faces.

Horrigan speaking after his swearing in
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

  Akron officially has a new mayor, one described by everyone from his predecessors to his daughters as ready to face the challenges of a city that’s not done remaking itself. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze has more from this morning’s inauguration of Dan Horrigan.

On one hand, Horrigan says Monday morning will be all about the mundane: assigning parking spots and computer passwords and attending meetings and more meetings.

More than 100 protesters closed streets in downtown Cleveland yesterday, the day after Cuyahoga County prosecutors announced no criminal charges would be filed against the two police officers involved in the killing of 12-year-old Tamir Rice in November of 2014. The protests remained peaceful and there were no arrests, though invectives were thrown at police.

Mayor Frank Jackson told the media he understands the frustration here and in other parts of the country.

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