Phil de Oliveira

Intern

Phil is a master’s student in Kent State University’s School of Journalism and Mass Communication (JMC). Prior to pursuing journalism, he earned a bachelor’s degree in music composition and piano. He also spent some time traveling Northern Africa, Europe and the Middle East. Phil currently lives in Cleveland Heights.

Ways to Connect

cover of NEA arts report
NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS

For the first time, the National Endowment for the Arts and the U.S. Department of Commerce's Bureau of Economic Analysis are releasing arts industry data for individual states. The numbers show government-funded arts programs accounted for more than four percent of the U.S. economy.

The new report looks at 35 industries that make up the arts and cultural sector of the U.S. economy.

Leedco wind farm
WKSU

Lakewood City Council is supporting the proposed Icebreaker wind farm in Lake Erie, which would be about 7  miles offshore from Lakewood.

Council passed a resolution that cites Ohio’s over-dependence on fossil fuels and a potential economic boost for the city.

photo of Escher String Quartet
SOPHIE ZHAI

The city of Akron and Tuesday Musical want to help the city relax using classical music. WKSU’s Phil de Oliveira reports on a new initiative to bring live chamber music to Akron’s public spaces.

The free, 45-minute concerts are part of a series called Decompression Chamber. The idea for the concerts came out of research suggesting classical music decreases stress and enhances brain function.

The Cleveland Clinic is selling art to benefit hearts. WKSU’s Phil de Oliveira reports next month’s auction at Christie’s in New York will include items from the Clinic’s collection.

The eight works for sale include sculptures and paintings by Roy Lichtenstein, Marc Chagall, and Pablo Picasso.

The artworks were donated to the Cleveland Clinic by philanthropist and entrepreneur Sydell Miller, whose collection spans impressionist and modern art.

A long-standing musical tradition in northeast Ohio is going through some changes.

WKSU’s Phil de Oliveira  reports on what’s in store for audiences at the 85th annual Bach Festival at Baldwin Wallace University.

One of the most dramatic changes this year may be the fact that the featured work on Saturday's concert won’t be music by J.S. Bach. Instead, concert goers will hear Ein Deutsches Requiem by Romantic composer Johannes Brahms.

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