Philip de Oliveira

Walton D. Clarke Fellow/Morning Edition Producer

Philip is the Walton D. Clarke Fellow at WKSU, where he reports and produces Morning Edition.

His reporting and music criticism have appeared in The Chautauquan Daily, Cleveland Scene magazine and Cool Cleveland. His reporting has aired locally, statewide on Ohio Public Radio stations, and nationally on NPR. Before pursuing journalism, he earned a degree in music composition and piano. He also spent some time traveling northern Africa, the Middle East, and Europe. He lived in Brazil for three years before moving to northeast Ohio. He currently lives in Cleveland Heights.

Ways to Connect

photo of a barn owl
BRUCE LOMBARDO / NATIONAL AUDUBON SOCIETY

Bird watchers all over Ohio are grabbing their binoculars for the 117th annual Christmas Bird Count, underway through Jan. 5th.

Every year, the National Audubon Society puts on the Christmas Bird Count, an official census of bird populations throughout the U.S. conducted by local organizers and volunteers.

One of those local organizers is Kurt Grenig.

Photo of dangerous algae bloom in Lake Erie
WKSU

Seven conservation groups from the Great Lakes region are threatening to sue the U.S. EPA, saying it has failed to enforce the Clean Water Act in Ohio.

The conservation groups are accusing the EPA of “foot-dragging” and ignoring the threat of toxic algae blooms, which affect drinking water and wildlife.

photo of Democratic Reps. Hearcel Craig, Greta Johnson (at podium) and Nickie Antonio
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio Rep. Greta Johnson is again calling for a special committee to deal with the state’s continuing opioid epidemic.

In an open letter addressed to House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger, Johnson says the opioid epidemic is straining healthcare services and discouraging employers from bringing their businesses to Ohio. She also says the state hasn’t done its part in dealing with the crisis.

Voters in Summit County
MARK URYCKI / WKSU

The Pew Research Center has released a report that shows a progressive decline of Democratic support in the nation’s middle class, not a sudden shift with this year’s election.

photo of Lordstown GM
WKSU

The Lordstown school district  has waived participation and classroom fees for its students, many of whose parents were laid off from the Lordstown GM factory last month.

The waiver applies to athletic programs, and fees for books and classroom supplies. There is no cost to participate in arts and music programs.

Lordstown Superintendent Terry Armstrong says recovering from economic hardship will take a community effort.

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