Tim Rudell

Senior Reporter

Tim Rudell has worked in broadcasting and news since his student days at Kent State in the late 1960s and early 1970s (when he earned extra money as a stringer for UPI). He began full time in radio news in 1972 in his home town of Canton, OH.  

In 1976 he moved to television and for the next dozen years did double duty as an anchorman and the news director for TV stations including the NBC affiliates in Youngstown, OH, Grand Rapids, MI, and Buffalo, NY. He then became Vice President of Consulting, and later Executive Vice President for one of the TV industry's leading research and consulting firms, Reymer & Gersin, Associates, with direct consulting assignments including newsrooms  in New York, Los Angles, Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, and Kansas City,.

In the 1990s, he was Vice President and Washington Bureau Chief for TVDirect, a joint venture of The Associated Press and Conus Communications that provided live and custom reporting from the nation's capital. Later he was promoted to Senior Vice President and division General Manager of Conus Washington, and eventually to Executive Vice President of Conus.  He then move over to the AP to become a member of the senior management of Associated Press Television News, responsible for advancing APTN's downstream businesses in North America. 

From 2004 through the end of 2008 he was Managing General Partner and CEO of a Washington area consulting group including Media Services Co. of America, and Independent Business Advisors of Virginia.  

In 2009 Tim and wife Fran decided  to return to their roots in northeast Ohio: "to go home, and do some things we wanted to do." He joined WKSU and became a reporter again, resuming the role that originally drew him to news.  

Ways to Connect

Canton Jewish Center
Tim Rudell / WKSU

Iimmigrants from around the world brought ethnic and religious diversity to northeast Ohio.  They helped build what for a time were some of the most vibrant towns and cities in America. But, that has been changing, as is happening with Canton and the evolving Jewish community here.

The vacant and often overgrown field used to be a busy playground and tennis courts. They, the  pool and the rest of the Canton Jewish Community Center have been closed now for five years. But, like the Jewish community itself, it once had an outsized effect.

Mayor (left), PD Chief (center), FD Chief (right)
Tim Rudell / WKSU

An income-tax increase is expected to be on the November ballot in Akron.

Mayor Dan Horrigan said today that a quarter-percent hike is needed to ensure adequate support for the city’s safety forces and critical infrastructure.

Fire Station 2 in east Akron is in rough shape. The mayor held a news conference there to make his case, joined by Fire Chief Clarence Tucker and Police Chief James Nice. They gave examples of layers-deep problems people don’t usually think about.

DAN HORRIGAN
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

Akron will be going to the voters in November to try to increase the city’s income tax from 2.25 to 2.5 percent.

In an announcement in one of the city's dilapidated fire stations, Mayor Dan Horrigan said the extra $16 million a year will go toward police and fire services and street repairs. Horrigan says state budget cuts have devastated his and other cities.

Aultman Heath Foundation

More healthcare industry consolidation is in the offing for northeast Ohio. Wednesday Canton-based Aultman Health Foundation signed a letter of intent to buy Alliance Community Hospital.

The two Stark county institutions operated separately for 116 years. But, Case-Western Reserve University professor J.B. Silvers says the current economic and political environment in healthcare is drawing them together.

Allegiant Airlines Flight
Allegiant Airlnes

President Donald Trump wants to privatize air traffic control.  He says the current system run by the Federal Aviation Administration is out of date and the private sector can get things squared away faster and cheaper.  But a leading economist says, “Perhaps not 

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