Tim Rudell

Senior Reporter

Tim Rudell has worked in broadcasting and news since his student days at Kent State in the late 1960s and early 1970s (when he earned extra money as a stringer for UPI). He began full time in radio news in 1972 in his home town of Canton, OH.  

In 1976 he moved to television and for the next dozen years did double duty as an anchorman and the news director for TV stations including the NBC affiliates in Youngstown, OH, Grand Rapids, MI, and Buffalo, NY. He then became Vice President of Consulting, and later Executive Vice President for one of the TV industry's leading research and consulting firms, Reymer & Gersin, Associates, with direct consulting assignments including newsrooms  in New York, Los Angles, Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, and Kansas City,.

In the 1990s, he was Vice President and Washington Bureau Chief for TVDirect, a joint venture of The Associated Press and Conus Communications that provided live and custom reporting from the nation's capital. Later he was promoted to Senior Vice President and division General Manager of Conus Washington, and eventually to Executive Vice President of Conus.  He then move over to the AP to become a member of the senior management of Associated Press Television News, responsible for advancing APTN's downstream businesses in North America. 

From 2004 through the end of 2008 he was Managing General Partner and CEO of a Washington area consulting group including Media Services Co. of America, and Independent Business Advisors of Virginia.  

In 2009 Tim and wife Fran decided  to return to their roots in northeast Ohio: "to go home, and do some things we wanted to do." He joined WKSU and became a reporter again, resuming the role that originally drew him to news.  

Ways to Connect

Buildng a natural gas pipeline
Energy Transfer Partners web site

Local challenges to natural gas pipeline projects like Rover and NEXUS have largely been unsuccessful in the courts and with regulators. But they may still be affecting the broader pipeline industry.

Ian Goodman heads a research and consulting group in energy economics.  He says any challenges--even local ones that don’t go anywhere--can cause delays. And those delays tend to worry investors. 

Tee box near Firestone CC club house
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

It's official.  After this year, the Firestone Country Club will no longer be home to the Bridgestone Invitational golf tournament.  The Commissioner of the PGA was in Akron Thursday to announce that starting in the summer of 2019 Akron will host the

photo of Sammis plant
FIRSTENERGY

The head of one of the nation’s biggest coal companies says he can keep First Energy Solutions' coal-fired power plants from shutting down.

Murray Energy CEO Robert Murray tells Bloomberg news that if government subsidies are granted he can get financing to buy the coal plants targeted for closing.  And with his company providing the coal, he says he can keep them running. 

photo of Crowd gathered for Akron Council
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Second Chance Village, a tent city for the homeless behind a thrift store in east Akron, is under threat of removal by the city for violating zoning laws.  But the people who live there have organized themselves and are formally applying for a conditional-use zoning permit. 

Photo of Perry nuclear power plant
NUCLEAR REGULATOR COMMISSION

First Energy Solutions says it’s going to shut down its nuclear power plants. And that means decommissioning them. It’s a lengthy, complex process with public-safety ramifications that by law must be done under the oversight of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.  Billy Dickson is the NRC’s regional Chief of Projects.

Pages