Tim Rudell

Senior Reporter

Tim Rudell has worked in broadcasting and news since his student days at Kent State in the late 1960s and early 1970s (when he earned extra money as a stringer for UPI). He began full time in radio news in 1972 in his home town of Canton, OH.  

In 1976 he moved to television and for the next dozen years did double duty as an anchorman and the news director for TV stations including the NBC affiliates in Youngstown, OH, Grand Rapids, MI, and Buffalo, NY. He then became Vice President of Consulting, and later Executive Vice President for one of the TV industry's leading research and consulting firms, Reymer & Gersin, Associates, with direct consulting assignments including newsrooms  in New York, Los Angles, Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, and Kansas City,.

In the 1990s, he was Vice President and Washington Bureau Chief for TVDirect, a joint venture of The Associated Press and Conus Communications that provided live and custom reporting from the nation's capital. Later he was promoted to Senior Vice President and division General Manager of Conus Washington, and eventually to Executive Vice President of Conus.  He then move over to the AP to become a member of the senior management of Associated Press Television News, responsible for advancing APTN's downstream businesses in North America. 

From 2004 through the end of 2008 he was Managing General Partner and CEO of a Washington area consulting group including Media Services Co. of America, and Independent Business Advisors of Virginia.  

In 2009 Tim and wife Fran decided  to return to their roots in northeast Ohio: "to go home, and do some things we wanted to do." He joined WKSU and became a reporter again, resuming the role that originally drew him to news.  

Ways to Connect

Tanker car fire following crude oil train derailment
By Sûreté du Québec - https://twitter.com/sureteduquebec/status/353519189769732096/photo/1, CC BY-SA 1.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=27152159 / Wikipedia

Trains carrying volatile crude oil across Ohio to East Coast refineries and ports in the U.S. and Canada will no longer include a kind of tanker cars that have proven to be easily ruptured in accidents.  

Four years ago, after several incidents of older-style tank cars bursting into flames in derailments, the federal government ordered them phased out by Jan. 1, 2018.  As that date nears, a Transportation Department report shows fewer than 300 of the cars are still in service.

Drillling rig in northeast Ohio
Tim Rudell / WKSU

Ohio’s oil and gas drilling boom started in 2010, peaked in 2013 and has been fading since then.  Now there are signs it may be picking up again. 

Larry Hecht runs Pier-48 on the Ohio River.  It’s an intermodal terminal for loading and off-loading barges.

At the height of the shale boom it got 25 bulk shipments of drilling supplies like barite a month. Then came the bust, and that traffic stopped.

needle and syringe
Psychonaught / commons.wikimedia.org

The Mahoning Valley has been one of the hardest hit areas in the state by the ongoing opioid crisis. As local officials continue to struggle to find ways to reduce the number of fatal overdoses, one program being tried in other parts of Northeast Ohio may provide some relief. As part of the media collaboration, Your Voice Mahoning Valley, we look at whether needle exchanges could provide a solution to the problem of opioid addiction.

 

 

Barb Ewing, CEO Youngstown Business Incubator
Commerce Department

A major Israeli business accelerator is now set to work with the Youngstown Business Incubator to bring high-tech start-ups to the Mahoning Valley. 

Youngstown incubator CEO Barb Ewing says the agreement with The Junction connects entrepreneurial tech ventures in Israel with markets and operating opportunities in Ohio.  

Coal-fired, Sammis Power Plant
NYttend / Wikipedia

The Ohio EPA is welcoming word that U.S. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt wants to repeal the national power plant emissions regulations written during the Obama Administration.

 

The Clean Power Plan never actually took effect because 28 states went to court to block it, arguing that it unfairly and illegally targeted coal-fired energy production. Ohio was among them as state EPA spokeswoman Heidi Griesmer explains.

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